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Decision making style

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Your score is shown on five scales, representing five decision making styles.
Rational decision making
Intuitive decision making
Dependent decision making
Avoidant decision making
Spontaneous decision making

The questionnaire you have just completed is called the General Decision Making Style questionnaire (GDMS). The questionnaire was originally designed and developed in the USA by Scott and Bruce (1995). It used a sample group of military officers and undergraduate students. The GDMS was developed in response to a lack of instruments available to determine an individuals preferred decision making style.

The questionnaire you have completed has given you the scores for the five decision making preferences:

rational
dependant
avoidant
intuitive
spontaneous

Click on each title to find out more about the style.

rational:

This approach is characterized by using a logical and structured approach to decision making. You may find using ideas such as SWOT or force field analysis helpful here.


dependant:

This approach is characterized by reliance upon the advice, direction and support of others. You will find that you are more comfortable making a decision when you have discussed the options with others, and are uncomfortable making decisions alone.


avoidant:

This approach is where you attempt to postpone or avoid making a decision. This is not a healthy way to approach making decisions. Whilst taking time to reflect on the options is a good idea, avoiding or postponing making the decision can lead to negative consequences.


intuitive:


This approach is characterized by a reliance upon hunches, feelings and impressions. You will go with 'gut instinct' or with what feels right, rather than taking a logical approach to the decision making.


spontaneous:


This is where the decision maker is impulsive and prone to making 'snap' or 'spur of the moment' decisions. This can be a valuable trait in terms of not over planning the future, but it is not always a good idea to leave important decisions to be made this way!

 




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