UCD

User's Guide to the General Regulations:

2017 / 2018 Academic Session
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What is progression and when does it occur?

Progression is what happens when a student completes an attempt at a stage and moves to the next stage of their programme.  Progression usually occurs at the end of an academic session but it may also occur after the first semester in certain situations, such as where a student has carried repeat modules.  Progression applies to all undergraduate programmes and to graduate taught programmes that are completed in more than one stage. 
(General Regulation 5.15)

How does a student progress from one stage of their programme to the next (or complete the programme)?

A student is normally considered to have completed an attempt at a stage or programme on the first occasion when they have attempted sufficient modules to meet the credit requirements of the stage or programme. The Programme Examination Board examines each student’s overall performance and determines whether the student is entitled to either progress to the next stage (or to complete the programme), subject to meeting the credit requirements of the stage (or programme) and any additional programme progression and completion requirements. 

Where the Programme Examination Board determines that a student has been awarded credit for modules fulfilling all of the requirements for a stage and meets any additional programme progression and completion requirements, the student may progress to the next stage or complete the programme. 
(General Regulations 5.1 and 5.15.1)

 

What grades count as an attempt at a module, for the purposes of determining whether a student has completed an attempt at a stage?

WL, WX, I and IX grades are considered as attempts at modules for the purpose of determining whether a student has attempted enough modules to meet the credit requirements of a stage — modules with these grades will be considered attempted credits.   AU and W grades are not considered to represent attempts at modules and will not count in this determination — credit will not be given for modules with these grades.  
(General Regulation 5.1)

  • So, for example, if an undergraduate student has 50 credits of As, Bs, Cs, Ds, Es, Fs or NGs and 10 credits of WX grades, the student has completed an attempt at a 60-credit stage.
  • If, on the other hand, an undergraduate student has 55 credits of As, Bs, Cc, Ds, Es, Fs or NGs and 5 credits of W, the student has not completed an attempt at a 60-credit stage.

What are additional programme progression requirements?

Some programmes may require that students meet additional requirements beyond the credit requirements such as passing certain modules or obtaining a minimum GPA in order to progress to the next stage. 
(General Regulation 5.15.1)

 

Does a student have to pass all of the modules taken in a stage in order to progress to the next stage?

No, students can progress to the next stage with as many as ten (10) credits of non-passed modules, that is modules with grades of E, F, G, NG, I, IX, IP, W, WL, WX and AU.  These modules are referred to as ‘carried modules’
(General Regulation 5.15.3)

What are some of the implications of progressing with carried modules?

Where modules are carried forward into the next stage the student must take, remediate, or substitute those modules in that stage. 
(General Regulation 5.15.3)


If any of these carried modules are pre-requisites for modules in the next stage, the student will not be able to take the next stage modules until the carried modules have been passed. 

If students progress to the next stage and have to retake one or two carried modules from the previous stage, what flexibility do they have to manage their work load?

Full-time undergraduate students who progress to the next stage carrying modules will be faced with taking those modules (up to 10 credits) as well as modules from the stage they are entering (normally, 30 credits per semester), giving them a possible credit surplus.  Students may take as many as 40 credits per semester if they decide to take their carried modules and a full load from the stage they are entering. 
(General Regulation 2.3; please note that General Regulation 2.3 specifies the student workload requirements for all students: part-time, full-time, undergraduate and graduate)

In order to maintain a manageable course load, students may opt to defer modules from the stage they are entering to the next stage, subject to approval of the Programme Board.  This may also be necessary if the module from the stage they are entering has a pre-requisite that has not yet been met or if there is a timetable restriction.  Deferring modules to the next stage is restricted in that the total credit value of the modules deferred cannot exceed the credit value of the modules carried forward.
(General Regulation 5.15.3)

  • For example, if a student progresses to Stage 2 with two carried modules from Stage 1 (10 credits), that student may repeat those Stage 1 modules and defer one Stage 2 module (5 credits) until the next academic session.  That student would then only be taking an additional 5 credits, for a total of 65 credits in the stage. 

 

Where a Programme Board determines that the overall workload for a particular student in a particular semester or academic session is unsustainable, the Programme Board will require such a student to adjust their workload.

(General Regulation 2.3)

 

If modules are carried or deferred, how does that affect the GPA?

Where modules are carried forward from a previous stage and completed and passed, these modules contribute to the stage GPA for the stage from which they are carried forward (i.e. the previous stage).
(General Regulation 5.15.4)

 

 

 

What is a repeat stage?

A repeat stage is considered a separate attempt at completing the credit and module requirements of the stage.  Students must repeat a stage when they do not earn sufficient credits to progress to the next stage.  They may also register for a repeat stage when they are entitled to progress but cannot pursue the minimum course load in the next stage (i.e. 20 credits in one semester or 50 credits for the year).  During a repeat stage attempt, the student is exempt from taking modules that they have already completed and passed.
(General Regulations 5.15.5 and 5.15.6)

If a student registers for a repeat stage, the student can finish the repeat stage in one semester (as opposed to an entire year) provided the student:

  • Is not required to repeat more than 30 credits;
  • Has met any module requirements; and
  • The timetable allows.

(General Regulation 5.15.7)

Taking modules from the next stage in advance of progressing: where a student cannot progress and is registered to a repeat stage, the student may normally register to modules from the next stage in advance of progressing to it where:

  • The student complies with the maximum workloads as set down in General Regulation 2.3:
    • 40 credits per semester or 70 credits per two-semester academic session for full-time undergraduate students (General Regulation 2.3.1);
    • 40 credits per semester or 90 credits in a full calendar year for full-time graduate taught students (General Regulation 2.3.3);
  • Module requirements are met (General Regulation 5.15.8); and
  • The modules from the next stage do not conflict with modules from the repeat stage.
    (General Regulation 5.15.8)