Lecture: Renaissance print culture, the sociability of texts, and scribal subversion in early modern Europe

Monday, 21 November 2011

Lecture: Renaissance print culture, the sociability of texts, and scribal subversion in early modern Europe

Speaker: Dr Earle Havens, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

Time: 5 pm Monday 21 November

Location: Seminar Room, UCD Humanities Institute

Sponsored by IRCHSS and Department of Taoiseach Research Project ‘Protestants, print and Gaelic culture, 1567-1722’ (PI: Dr Marc Caball) and in collaboration with UCD Micheál Ó Cléirigh Institute

Earle Havens is the William Kurrelmeyer Curator of Rare Books & Manuscripts in the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University, whose rare book collections encompass the holdings of the Milton Eisenhower Library on the central campus, and two historic 19th-century rare book collections, the George Peabody Library and the John Work Garrett Library at the Evergreen Museum.  Dr. Havens holds a joint-Ph.D. in History & Renaissance Studies from Yale University, and also holds an faculty appointment at Johns Hopkins as Adjunct Associate Professor in Department of German & Romance Languages & Literatures, where he teaches undergradute and graduate-level courses on the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, with an emphasis on books and material culture during the 15th and 16th centuries.

His major publications include volumes on the commonplace book tradition, Elizabethan book culture, and material representations of Joan of Arc from the Renaissance to the modern era, among others.  His most recent publications include a scholarly study of the library and book collecting of the 18th-century virtuoso collector, Horace Walpole, and (with Dr. Stephen Parks) a large-scale illustrated catalogue of the rare book and manscript collection of the Elizabethan Club of Yale University, coming out from the Yale Unversity Press in December 2011.  His most recent research deals with illicit printing, networks of book smugglers, and scribes of the Roman Catholic underground in 16th–century Britain, the Spanish Netherlands, France, Italy, and Spain.