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Wartime Attachments: a podcast series on pain, care, retreat and treatment in the First World War.

Funded by the Irish Research Council
Edited with an introduction by Barry Sheils, University College Dublin

These talks with scholars from a variety of academic disciplines offer a reconsideration of the emotional and institutional attachments of the First World War. Engaging with themes of psychiatric care, pharmacological innovation and wartime appetites, the series attempts to uncover, from within acts of historical representation and remembrance, questions of physical and mental wellbeing that remain relevant today.

The lectures were recorded for podcasting by Real Smart Media and are also available on the Humanities Institute podcast series on iTunes.

Presentation slides and a full citable transcript accompany each recording.


Introduction by Barry Sheils

Barry Sheils is IRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the UCD School of English, Drama and Film and organiser of 'Wartime Attachments: a podcast series on pain, care, retreat and treatment in the First World War'. In this episode Barry introduces the series.

Download a transcript of Barry Sheils' introduction as a PDF


Julie Walsh - 1914: Psychoanalysis and the Narcissistic Wound

Julie Walsh is a Global Research Fellow at Warwick University and a practicing psychoanalytic psychotherapist qualified with the SITE for Contemporary Psychoanalysis in London. Her latest book is called Narcissism and its Discontents (Palgrave, 2014) and her current research project explores the relationship between shame and sociability.

Download a transcript of the paper in PDF

1914: Psychoanalysis and the Narcissistic Wound by Julie Walsh (Slides)


Brendan Kelly - 'He Lost Himself Completely’: Shell Shock and its Treatment at Dublin’s Richmond War Hospital, 1916-1919

Brendan Kelly is Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Consultant Psychiatrist in the School of Medicine and Medical Science at UCD. His latest books include, ‘He Lost Himself Completely’: Shell Shock and its Treatment at Dublin’s Richmond War Hospital, 1916-1919 (Liffey, 2015), Ada English: Patriot and Psychiatrist (Irish Academic, 2014) and Custody, Care and Criminality: Forensic Psychiatry and the Law in 19th-Century Ireland (History Press, 2014).

'He Lost Himself Completely’: Shell Shock and its Treatment at Dublin’s Richmond War Hospital, 1916-1919 by Brendan Kelly (Slides)


Sara Haslam - Contested Ground: alcohol, attachment, and the hut habit at war

Sara Haslam is Senior Lecturer in English at the Open University. She is author of Fragmenting Modernism: Ford Madox Ford, the Novel and the Great War (Manchester, 2002), and editor of three of Ford’s works, including an annotated critical edition of A Man Could Stand Up – volume 3 of Ford’s Parade’s End (Carcanet Press, 2011). Further publications include Life Writing (Routledge, 2009, with Derek Neale) and essays on Henry James, Thomas Hardy, the Brontës, and the literature of the First World War, most recently in the Journal of First World War Studies (4.2, October 2013) and online for The Conversation.

Download a transcript of the paper in PDF

Contested Ground: alcohol, attachment, and the hut habit at war by Sara Haslam (Slides)


Rachel Duffett - "As good as Mother makes?": Food, Family and the Western Front

Rachel Duffett is the author of The Stomach for Fighting: Food and the Soldiers of the Great War (MUP, 2012) and joint-editor of Food and War in Tweneth Century Europe (Ashgate, 2011). She has written extensively on the significance of food in the war and has contributed to numerous radio, TV and magazine features. Her latest research project is on the legacy of the war in chidren's play and toys and 'Playing Soldiers?' has just been published in Children's Literature and Culture of the First World War (Routledge, 2016).

Download a transcript of the paper in PDF

"As good as Mother makes?": Food, Family and the Western Front by Rachel Duffett (Slides).


Andrew Frayn - Attachments and coping towards the end of the First World War: D. H. Lawrence's Bay (1919)

D. H. Lawrence described his poetry collection 'Bay', published in a limited edition in 1919 by Cyril Beaumont having been in press for over a year, as 'more or less about the war'. It is a document of the dying days of the conflict, largely conceived and written in early 1918 as Lawrence struggled to live by the pen following the suppression of 'The Rainbow' (1915) and his ejection from Cornwall in 1917. In this talk, Andrew Frayn examines the attachments that sustained Lawrence as his parlous personal situation coincided with the fraught final year of the war.

Download a transcript of the paper in PDF

Attachments and coping towards the end of the First World War: D. H. Lawrence's Bay (1919) by Andrew Frayn (Slides).