Teaching

Andrew and Albert

Classical Mechanics and Relativity (PHYC30020)
UCD 3rd year undergraduate physics: Semester 1, 2017/18


The first part of this module covers non-relativistic classical mechanics with applications: generalised coordinates, degrees of freedom, Lagrange's formalism and Lagrange's equations of motion, Hamilton's principle and Hamilton's equation of motion, central force motion, continuous systems and fields. The second part of this module covers special relativity with applications in particle and astrophysics: Michelson-Morley experiment, Einstein's postulates, Lorentz transformations, time dilation and length contraction, relativity of simultaneity, four-vector formalism, relativistic energy-momentum-mass relationship, and relativistic imaging.

For more information, click here.

Electromagnetism (PHYC30070)
UCD 3rd year undergraduate physics: Semester 2, 2017/18


This module presents the field theory of electromagnetism. Gauss's Law, Ampere's Law, Biot-Savart's Law and Faraday's Law are examined, leading to Maxwell's Equations. The physical significance of these equations is emphasised. Solutions to Maxwell's Equations in the form of electromagnetic waves are presented. The behaviour of electromagnetic fields in vacuum, dielectric and magnetic media, conductors, wave-guides, and at the interface between different media is described. Electromagnetism as a relativistic phenomenon is discussed and the nature of light is investigated. The source of electromagnetic radiation is identified.

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Advanced Lab - computational physics (PHYC303XX)
UCD 3rd year undergraduate physics: Semesters 1 & 2, 2017/18

Theoretical Physics Projects (PHYC40090)
UCD 4th year undergraduate physics Bachelor's thesis: Semesters 1 & 2, 2017/18

Principles of Scientific Enquiry (PHYC10010)
UCD 1st year undergraduate science: Semester 1, 2017/18





Previous courses:

Classical Mechanics and Relativity (PHYC30020)
UCD Physics 2016/17

Electromagnetism (PHYC30070)
UCD Physics 2016/17

Numerical methods for quantum impurity problems

Part of the Dutch Research School of Theoretical Physics (DRSTP)
Doorn, Netherlands (9-20th March 2015)


Course Summary:
'Quantum impurity models' are classic paradigms for strong electron correlations in condensed matter physics. They underpin the theoretical description of magnetic impurities in metals, nanodevices such as quantum dots, and appear as effective models within the dynamical mean field theory of correlated materials. Non-perturbative quantum many-body methods must be employed to solve such problems. In this course, we provide the conceptual framework of the Numerical Renormalization Group, discuss technical/practical details of the calculation, and present relevant applications.

Visit the 'Quantum impurity' course website


Numerical Methods for Many-Particle Systems (Graduate)

Held at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Cologne, Germany.
In conjunction with the Bonn-Cologne Graduate School of Physics and Astronomy.

Course Summary:
This intensive course is intended to provide both a working understanding and real hands-on experience with the essential numerical techniques of solid state many-body physics. Rather than a 'black-box' philosophy, the course aims to discuss the theory and physics underpinning numerical approaches. Lectures will introduce models of central importance, such as the Ising model, the Anderson impurity model, the Hubbard model and the Heisenberg model. Using these as concrete examples, the Monte Carlo, Exact Diagonalization, Numerical Renormalization Group and Density Matrix Renormalization Group techniques will be discussed. Students will also gain supervised practical hands-on experience writing, using and modifying simple computer codes to solve real problems.

Visit the 'Numerical Methods' course website


Numerical Renormalization Group (Graduate)

Held at the Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Course Summary:
'Quantum Impurity Problems' are classic paradigms for strong electron correlations in condensed matter physics. They underpin the theoretical description of magnetic impurities in metals, nanodevices such as quantum dots, and appear as effective models within the dynamical mean field theory of correlated materials. Non-perturbative quantum many-body methods must be employed to solve such problems. In this course, we provide the conceptual framework of the Numerical Renormalization Group, discuss technical/practical details of the calculation, and present relevant applications.

Visit the 'Numerical Renormalization Group' course website


Mathematics (Undergraduate)

Held at Oxford University, UK.

Course Summary:
Designed to provide the foundational and advanced mathematics required in physical chemistry and beyond, this course comprises weekly lectures and classes throughout the first year of the Undergraduate chemistry degree at Oxford University.

Visit the course website