Open positions in the group

PhD studentships available -- apply now!

Nanoelectronics theory: semiconductor quantum dot devices

Supervisor: Dr Andrew Mitchell
Fully funded PhD positions are available in the newly-established theoretical nanoelectronics group at UCD. Nanoscale components incorporated into electronic circuits are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics, leading to exotic physics with no classical analogue. The next generation of miniaturized electronics will exploit the novel functionality of the nano to build new quantum technologies. The focus of this project is the theory of new 'charge-Kondo' semiconductor quantum dot devices, which are emerging as a new paradigm for designer nanophysics. The successful candidate will work on fundamental theory as well as developing sophisticated quantum simulations for new devices. Issues such as quantum criticality, entanglement, and fractionalization will be investigated. You will work closely with our world-leading experimental collaborators, and possible industrial contact through the Enterprise Partnership Scheme.

Nanoelectronics theory: molecular electronics

Supervisor: Dr Andrew Mitchell
Fully funded PhD positions are available in the newly-established theoretical nanoelectronics group at UCD. The continual miniaturization of electronic components has now reached the nanoscale. Single-molecule devices represent the extreme limit, where quantum effects dominate. With robust and reproducible chemical complexity, nature has provided us with components of almost limitless variety, making molecular junctions the ultimate building blocks of nanoelectronics. The challenge is understanding how to harness this potential. The focus of this project is the theory of single-molecule break junctions, where the interplay between quantum interference effects and strong electron interactions can produce new physics and therefore new possible applications, such as efficient 'quantum interference effect transistors'. The successful candidate will develop state-of-the-art computational techniques to simulate such devices, working closely with leading experimental molecular electronics collaborators.

Condensed matter theory: correlated materials and topological matter

Supervisor: Dr Andrew Mitchell
Strong electronic interactions in materials can produce a rich range of physics from superconductivity to spin liquids. Despite their fundamental importance both in science and technology, many open questions remain due to the enormous theoretical challenge posed by quantum many-body problems. New topological quantum materials have also recently emerged, including graphene, topological insulators, Dirac and Weyl semimetals, and Kitaev spin liquids. Such systems are characterized by a nonlocal order, and are therefore remarkably robust to disorder, making them excellent candidates for future applications, including quantum computation. In this project, correlated multiband materials, such as transition metal oxides, will be studied using state-of-the-art implementations of dynamical mean field theory. Topological systems will also be investigated, and the fundamental interplay between topology and interactions will be addressed.

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