Chemical giant DuPont acquires UCD spin-out OxyMem

Posted 19 December, 2019

Wayne Byrne, Dr Eoin Syron and Professor Eoin Casey, the co-founders of OxyMem a spin-out company from the UCD School of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering

US chemicals giant DuPont has acquired full ownership over OxyMem, a University College Dublin spin-out company.

Co-founded by Wayne Byrne, Professor Eoin Casey and Dr Eoin Syron in 2013 as a spin-out from the UCD School of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering, OxyMem develops and produces technology to treat and purify wastewater.

The company has more than 60 employees and a production site in Athlone.

The company has seen its patented Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor units used in more than 30 major water treatment projects in over 14 countries. 

Tom Flanagan, UCD Director of Enterprise and Commercialisation, praised the acquisition of the UCD spin-out company, saying it represented an “excellent example” of the commercialisation of the University’s research output.

“OxyMem… is an excellent example of the quality of companies emerging from the University over the last number of years with the support of NovaUCD.

“While only established in 2013, [it] has already grown significantly, employing over 60 people, with a manufacturing site in Athlone and secured significant investment and major clients around the world. 

“I would like to wish the OxyMem team continuing success as part of DuPont as it scales to meet the growing global demand for the MABR technology to treat wastewater.”

Dupont, which is ranked among the world’s largest chemical companies, is a leader in water purification and separation technology. 

Employing some 98,000 people across the globe, in 2018 recorded a total revenue of €19.80 billion.

“MABR is a new technology that offers unique and differentiated performance for secondary wastewater treatment over existing technologies,” said HP Nanda, Global Vice-President and General Manager, DuPont Water Solutions.

“Wastewater is a fast-growing global market driven by industrial expansion, challenging water conditions and tightening regulations.”

By: Staff Writers, UCD University Relations