Scholarships

UCD Graduate Studies Scholarships

Newman Fellowship in the History of Rugby in Leinster

As part of its programme to provide post-doctoral research opportunities for scholars of proven academic excellence, University College Dublin invites applications for a prestigious Newman Fellowship in the History of Rugby in Leinster.

This Fellowship will examine the history of rugby in Leinster within the context of the evolution of Irish society. The project will trace the involvement of Leinster boys in rugby football from the pre-history of the game at Rugby School which was attended by various Irish students through to the present day. It will set out the manner in which the pioneers of rugby in Ireland began their work in Dublin, and then spread the game out through the province. The project will trace the central role played by Leinster men in the establishment of the Irish Football Union (later renamed the Irish Rugby Football Union) in 1874, the establishment of provincial branches in 1879 and the subsequent history of the Leinster branch. Inevitably, the politics of Irish independence and of the Great War will be addressed. The project will also trace the social and economic place of rugby in Irish history, the importance of the rugby club within communities, the relationship between rugby and educational institutions, and the development of the game in the years after partition. Finally, the project will examine how the traditions of amateur play later gave way to professionalism and a sustained era of success for Leinster rugby, as well as bringing the rise of women’s rugby.

The successful candidate will have a proven record of publication in modern Irish history, including an academic monograph and peer-reviewed articles. The Fellowship holder will be expected to produce an original monograph and participate in outreach activities.

The UCD School of History is the largest department of history on the island of Ireland. It is ranked in the top 100 History Schools worldwide.

Informal enquiries regarding this Fellowship may be directed to Associate Professor Paul Rouse (p.rouse@ucd.ie)

Candidates must supply a cover letter setting how out they would undertake this project, as well as submitting a completed Newman Fellowship Application Form, a CV and two copies of the Newman Fellowship Referee Form. Completed applications consisting of one electronic copy (with all required documents contained in one PDF file) should be e-mailed to: graduatestudies@ucd.ie

Should you choose to send applications by post, please ensure sufficient time for receipt of applications before the closing date.

Please post to:

Elizabeth Crean

REFERENCE: Newman Fellowship

UCD Graduate Studies

Room 0.14, Tierney Building

UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

 The closing date for receipt of completed applications is 5 p.m. on Wednesday 23rd Oct 2019.

 

Call for PhD & Post Doc applications – Cloud-based Building Information Modelling (CBIM)

CBIM is a new European research and training network in the area of Cloud-based Building Information Modelling. There are 14 fully funded PhD positions for highly talented people who are eligible for study at any one of its partner universities. Each PhD student will be employed full time for three years at one of the CBIM partner universities or at one of the three CBIM beneficiary companies, while pursuing a PhD degree at one of the universities. There is also one funded Post Doc position at the Technion.

CBIM Universities: 

  • University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • University College London, United Kingdom
  • Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
  • Technical University of Berlin, Germany
  • University College Dublin, Ireland

CBIM Companies

  • Trimble Oy, Espoo, Finland
  • LocLab Consulting, Darmstadt, Germany
  • Fundacion CARTIF, Valladolid, Spain

CBIM is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 program under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network call, and the stipends/salaries are particularly generous. For more information about:

- CBIM, please visit the relevant website: https://cbim2020.net.technion.ac.il

- instructions for how to apply for one of the 14 PhD (ESR - early stage researcher) positions: https://cbim2020.net.technion.ac.il/call-for-applications-1/

- the Post Doc position, please write to Prof. Rafael Sacks, at cvsacks@technion.ac.il

 

Doctoral Scholarship in Technology and Society

The design and use of technology has serious implications for society as a whole. There is increasing public concern about issues such as anthropogenic climate change, the proliferation of military and surveillance technologies, and the possible impacts of automation and artificial intelligence. However, decisions about technological systems are often made without transparency or democratic oversight. Engineers bear much of the responsibility for the development, construction, and maintenance of technological systems, but in whose interests do they act? Engineering institutions claim to be committed to public welfare, but can engineers really balance that commitment with meeting the demands of employers and clients? There is in fact evidence to suggest that the culture of engineering education and professional practice discourages engineers from placing sufficient importance on public welfare. Further research is needed in this area; this PhD will address that need by exploring the relationship between engineering, professional responsibility, and public welfare. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches will be used to investigate the beliefs and attitudes of engineering students and professionals in Ireland, as well as the contexts in which these engineers study and work.

Applications for this PhD Scholarship are invited from candidates from a broad range of disciplinary backgrounds, including but not limited to sociology, anthropology, psychology, human geography, education, and design. Candidates should have or expect to obtain a bachelor’s or master’s degree in their field. Please direct any queries about the project or application to donal.holland@ucd.ie.

Scholarship: The scholarship covers all academic fees and includes a stipend of €15,000 per annum for four years and a travel budget to allow attendance at conferences.

How to Apply: Please submit a CV and cover letter explaining your interest in the project to donal.holland@ucd.ie.

Closing date for applications: Monday, 30th September 2019

 

PhD Opportunity: 3D printing of polymer medical devices

3D printing (Additive Manufacturing), is increasing being applied for the fabrication of medical devices. One of the advantages of the technology is its ability to tailor the design, to meet specific patient needs. Given the individualized part printing however, a key consideration is to ensure the quality of the printed device. This PhD project will involve the printing of both polymeric and fibre reinforced polymer composites, for use in prosthetic devices. The printing will be carried out using both a laboratory and a pilot scale Fused Filament Fabrication system. The physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the printed parts will be extensively investigated and correlated with the processing conditions. A number of advanced process diagnostic techniques (including optical imagining), will be used to monitor the printing process. Working closely with colleagues in Computer Science, the data collected will be analysed, in order to provide process feedback. The objective is to determine if the in-process measurements can be correlated with print defects (i.e. porosity), and where possible can help to predict the formation of defects before they occur.

Web siteswww.I-Form.ie and www.ucd.ie/surfaces

Funding: Scholarship support for this PhD is through the Science Foundation Ireland I-Form Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre. PhD funding is available for EU students only.

Applicant requirement: A minimum of a 2.1 honours degree in Engineering, Chemistry, Physics or Materials Science.

Application: To apply, please submit a CV and cover letter to Prof. Denis Dowling, I-Form Centre, University College Dublin (denis.dowling@ucd.ie). Closing date for applications Monday September 16th, 2019.

 

Neuropsychology PhD position in UCD School of Psychology and Temple Street Hospital

Project: Neuropsychological outcomes of Irish Children treated for Brain injury and Epilepsy

The UCD Neuropsychology Laboratory and UCD Centre for Disability Studies at the School of Psychology, University College Dublin (UCD) in collaboration with Temple Street Children’s University Hospital (TSCUH), is looking for a self-motivated student for a project examining long-term outcomes of children treated for brain injury in TSCUH, with a special focus on epilepsy. This project is funded by the Temple Street Foundation. The position will provide funding for a three-year fulltime PhD (6,170 annual contribution towards fees plus annual stipend of 16k).

Collaborative Research Team: Dr. Michelle Downes (UCD), Dr. Christine Linehan (UCD), Dr. Cathy Madigan (TSCUH)

Start date: expected Autumn 2019 (September 2019 or January 2020)

The problem: Children with brain injury experience poorer long-term outcomes in academic and social domains. These children often experience a range of neuropsychological deficits that can act as barriers in everyday life contexts. Cognitive deficits can be experienced in domains such as language, attention, memory, processing speed, executive functioning, and impulse control. Some children with a history of brain injury experience difficulties in one particular domain, such as language, where as other children experience difficulties across a number of cognitive domains. The neurocognitive profile for two children with similar presenting conditions can differ dramatically.

Paediatric neuropsychology is a relatively new discipline, however in the past few decades research has helped to establish how factors-other than diagnosis contribute to long-term outcomes for an individual child. Factors such as age at diagnosis, time to treatment, socio-economic status, family function, and comorbid conditions can play a huge role in contributing to an individual child’s long-term adaptive success and quality of life. We currently lack information on how these children re-adapt into their home and school environments or how many of these children go on to have long-term neuropsychological difficulties that lead to academic failure. It is crucial to gain a picture of how many of these children struggle with reintegration into school and eventually work environments and how many of these children achieve later independence. It is vital to capture the burden of neuropsychological dysfunction in children treated for brain injury in order to identify gaps in treatment pathways and to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical care in Ireland.

The student will be involved in the development of a new database for children with brain injury. These children are not followed up clinically after the age of 16 years so their longer-term outcomes remain unknown. The primary goal for the student will be to establish trends in treatment and neuropsychological function and to investigate long term neuropsychological outcomes in Irish children with epilepsy and other types of brain injury. In addition to the core research outcomes we hope to develop a family friendly report that can be produced as a resource for those whose children have been recently diagnosed in order to prepare them for long-term neuropsychological planning.

The student will be primarily based within the School of Psychology, UCD but will also have an honorary contract with TSCUH. The successful applicant will join a team of PhD students in the School of Psychology. Research participants will be recruited through TSCUH.

The applicant: The applicant will be a psychology graduate with a relevant MA/Msc and experience of working with medical data and/or experience of working with children/patient populations.

Essential Qualities

  • BA/BSc honours level degree in psychology from an accredited course (minimum 2.1 award)
  • MA/MSc in Psychology
  • Research assistant experience
  • Experience in data analysis (e.g. excel, SPSS, R)
  • Experience with child/patient research participants
  • Excellent English writing skills
  • Strong interpersonal qualities

Non-Essential, Desirable qualities

  • Experience with neuropsychological tests (e.g., BSID, WAIS, WPPSI)
  • Experience working with medical data
  • Experience working in a hospital setting

The awarding of the funding is dependent on the successful applicant being accepted for a PhD by the School of Psychology, UCD.

Please send a Curriculum Vitae, academic transcripts, contacts for two academic references, and a brief statement of interest outlining what you can bring to the project to michelle.downes@ucd.ie by 5pm August 25th 2019.

 

PhD Opportunity: Carbon sequestration and storage in Irish coastal wetlands

Studentship details: Stipend of €16,000 per annum (plus EU fees only) for up to maximum 4 years. Consumables and training/conference travel budget is also included.

Coastal wetland ecosystems are critical to maintaining human well-being and global carbon cycling. In particular, tidal saltmarshes provide numerous ecosystem services including protection from storm surge and sea-level rise, erosion prevention along shorelines, nutrient cycling, sediment trapping and habitat provision which are essential for climate adaptation and resilience. Saltmarshes remove large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and bury it in soils for centuries to millennia. This carbon sequestered in coastal vegetated habitats has been termed "blue carbon". Their contribution per unit area to long-term carbon sequestration is estimated to be 10 times greater than tropical forests. Such high rates of carbon sequestration are attributed to high rates of plant production, low rates of decomposition, and a unique ability to trap sediments.

However, little is known about the carbon dynamics in tidal saltmarshes in Ireland, and it may be that they are hotspots of carbon storage due to a number of factors. The mild, wet climate produces one of the longest growing seasons in the world for grasslands. Therefore, it is likely that Irish coastal wetlands which are dominated by grass, rush and sedge species, also have an exceptionally long growing season translating into high productivity rates and subsequent carbon sequestration. In comparison to raised and blanket bogs, coastal wetlands emit low levels of CH4 (methane) gas due to inhibition of methanogens by sulphate in seawater.

In this PhD project you will investigate carbon sequestration and storage in tidal marshes under the supervision of Dr Grace Cott (School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin). Using a combination of soil and gas sampling techniques you will measure carbon stocks and CH4 fluxes and test what controls carbon preservation rates by measuring sedimentation rates, decomposition rates, redox potential, soil oxygen content and hydraulic conductivity. This work will enhance our understanding of how Irish coastal wetlands contribute to climate mitigation.

Informal enquiries are welcome and should be made to Dr Grace Cott (grace.cott@ucd.ie).

Minimum educational background: BSc or MSc degree (2.1 grade or above) in Environmental Science/Biological Sciences/Plant Biology/Soil Science/Ecology or related discipline.

Desirable: prior field work experience in wetland sites, experience in soil sampling, and experience in using R for statistical analysis.

The successful candidate should be enthusiastic, self-motivated and willing to learn new tools and technologies. As part of this PhD the candidate will be expected to demonstrate/assist in undergraduate practicals for a minimum of 6 hours per week for the academic session.

To apply please send your cover letter, CV and details of two referees to Dr Grace Cott (grace.cott@ucd.ie).

Closing date: 17th July, 2019.

 

Masters by Research: Exploring molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of human Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease (CD) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting the digestive tract. It is estimated that about 20,000 people in Ireland are living with IBD and there is currently no cure except for disease management. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease pathology is vital in identifying therapeutic targets. This project aims to investigate the potential role of a Nod-like receptor in the pathogenesis of CD. This target molecule is implicated in the gut for microbial dysbiosis and immune cell function.

The successful applicant will process samples obtained from patients or stored in biobanks and will employ molecular biology skills such as cell culture, qPCR and protein extraction. This research will be conducted at the Education and Research Centre, St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Elm park, Dublin 4.

Requirements: Applicants should have an honours degree (2.1 or equivalent) in Biological Sciences, Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Immunology or related discipline. Previous hands-on experience in research laboratory work will be desirable.

Award: Scholarship include a stipend of €16,000 per annum for the one year duration of the research. UCD postgraduate fees will be included (EU rate).

Closing date: 2nd August 2019

Preferred start date: 2nd September 2019

Interested candidates should please send their cover letter, CV and details of two referees to Dr Dina Danso-Abeam (dina.danso-abeam@ucd.ie)

 

Marie Skłodowska Curie European Training Network: 8 PhD positions available for EU training network  under Innovative Training Networks (ITN) of Horizon 2020

PROTECT

Climate change and food safety have become interdependent worldwide research priorities. The overarching aim of this Innovative Training Network (ITN) is to provide high-level training in Predictive mOdelling Tools to evaluate the Effects of Climate change on food safeTy (PROTECT). The project will provide sound scientifically based knowledge for management options and decisions on new and emerging food safety threats due to climate change. Specific case studies will be focused on the dairy industry (e.g. cheese, yogurt, liquid milk) and emerging chemical and biological threats. Tools will focus on the change in chemical levels and microbial populations in relation to the dairy industry and assess how levels will change under climate change pressures. The skills and knowledge gained through the network will be a critically important step towards better management of future food supplies.

The goals of the network will be achieved by a unique combination of “hands-on” research training, non-academic placements, summer schools and workshops on research-related and transferable skills facilitated by the academic and non-academic composition of the consortium. PROTECT brings together intersectoral and multidisciplinary expertise from 11 European Countries (7 third level educational institutions, 6 industry partners, 1 United Nations agency). The consortium will share technical and training expertise to recruit and train 8 highly skilled Early stage researchers (ESRs) in advanced modelling tools to investigate the impact of climate change on food safety. The research work consists of 3 technical work packages with 8 individual research projects each looking at a specific aspect of predictive modelling and the influence of climate change on food safety. An important element of the training network is the Network wide training events and industry secondments and the emphasis on training all ESRs in key transferable skills.

The project is currently recruiting 8 post-graduate researchers with specialization in Food Science, Biostatistics, Food Microbiology, Biosystems and Food Engineering, Environmental Science, Chemical and Environmental Engineering or related discipline. 

Positions are offered for 3 years for the following individual research projects 

PhD1: Development of a Feed Chain Risk Assessment (FCRA) to assess the increased risk from mycotoxins in animal feed as a result of climate change and potential transfer to dairy produce for human consumption

PhD2: Modelling the dynamics of microbial change: dairy food production processes and process/waste water of (dairy) food

PhD3: Modelling the dynamics of microbial change: dairy food products

PhD4: Develop a Quantitative Microbial Exposure Assessment (QMEA) model to assess the impact of key process steps on both risk for human health and commercial sterility failure rate

PhD5: Modelling the dynamics of microbial change: non-refrigerated food products

PhD6: Simulation and evaluation of energy use in the dairy industry: effect of a climate change scenario on the supply chain

PhD7: Improving the environmental sustainability of the dairy products value chains by the combined use of LCA and RA methodologies

PhD8: Development of a DSS based upon risk assessment and predictive tools

Further information can be found on Call_for_ESR_PROTECT EURAXESS final

 

Masters by Research: Use of antimicrobials in animal production on the island of Ireland

The use of antimicrobials in animals and the consequences of such use for the spread of antimicrobial resistance via the food chain and, ultimately, for human health are of global concern. 

The successful candidate will explore the use of antimicrobials on the island of Ireland across all farmed species. Data will be collated across a range of sources to identify baseline trends and associations, and remaining knowledge gaps will be identified. A review of existing scientific literature will reveal good practices internationally with regard to monitoring antimicrobial use at farm level, and the insights used to provide recommendations for addressing knowledge deficits regarding antimicrobial usage on the island of Ireland. 

This project will be part of a larger programme of research investigating the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of relevant stakeholders regarding antimicrobial use at farm level. Therefore, the successful candidate will be working with a multidisciplinary team including veterinarians, sociologist and psychologists.

There is potential scope to transition to a PhD during the course of this Masters if desired by the candidate and subject to additional funding.

Requirements: Applicants should have an honours degree (2.1 or equivalent) in veterinary medicine, animal science, or a related discipline, and be citizens of the EU (project funding cannot support non-EU fees).  A full clean driving licence is required. 

Award: The scholarship (tax free) is €18,000 per annum for 2 years.  In addition, UCD postgraduate fees will be paid.

Closing date: 22nd June 2019

Preferred start date:  1st August 2019

Further information:  please contact egmanzanilla@gmail.com or conor.mcaloon@ucd.ie

 

PhD Opportunity: Identifying Molecular and Genetic Regulators of Plant Programmed Cell Death

Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of the plant lifecycle from embryogenesis to senescence. This genetically controlled pathway of cell destruction can be also elicited by environmental stress. Invading pathogens, heavy metals, heat, UV radiation, waterlogging and salinity can induce PCD in order to isolate and remove damaged tissues, and potentially to amplify systemic stress signalling, thereby ensuring the survival of the organism. Consequently, PCD is a fundamentally important process in plants that needs to be tightly controlled for normal growth, development and interactions with environment. 

Understanding the intricacies of PCD regulation is a grand challenge for the plant science research community, especially considering that an increasingly volatile climate may limit crop production and put global food security at risk. The past two decades of research have uncovered a number of signalling pathways and cellular events associated with different types of plant PCD. Despite this, the understanding of this essential process and our ability to manipulate it is still lacking, and it is unclear whether a common core machinery controlling plant PCD exists.  

In this PhD project you will study plant PCD under supervision of Dr. Joanna Kacprzyk and Dr. Paul McCabe (School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin). You will define the PCD pathways in plants at the systems level using global transcriptional (RNA-seq) and translational (ribosome footprinting) profiling. You will functionally validate any identified candidate PCD genes. Finally, you will determine the effect of elevated carbon dioxide on PCD signalling in plants. This work will contribute to strategies for development of climate-proofed agriculture. 

Studentship details: Stipend of €16 000 per annum (plus EU fees) for up to maximum 4 years. Consumables and training/conference travel budget is also included. 

The informal enquiries are welcome and should be made to Dr. Joanna Kacprzyk (joanna.kacprzyk@ucd.ie) or Dr. Paul McCabe (paul.mccabe@ucd.ie).  

Minimum educational background: BSc or MSc degree (2.1 grade or above) in Biological Sciences/Molecular Biology/Cell Biology/Genetics/Plant Biology or related discipline.  

Desirable: prior experience in working in research laboratory, experience in handling NGS data and using R. 

The successful candidate should be enthusiastic, self-motivated and willing to learn new tools and technologies.

To apply please send your cover letter, CV and details of two referees to Dr Joanna Kacprzyk (joanna.kacprzyk@ucd.ie).

Closing date: Sunday 16th June, 2019.

 

3 PhD Positions in hydrological impacts, modelling and innovative solutions to prevent environmental pollution from managed peatlands

3 highly motivated PhD students will work on an interdisciplinary four-year project funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland) investigating Strategies to improve Water quality from Managed Peatlands (SWAMP project). Starting date: 01/9/2019.

The primary objective of SWAMP is to develop an interdisciplinary approach to quantify the pressures on waters arising from drained/extracted peatlands and develop appropriate regulatory measures, sustainable land use management and innovative technologies to ensure the status of water bodies is protected, maintained or improved in line with the requirements of national and international environmental standards.

PhD 1: Experimental studies evaluating water pollution mitigation measures at drained and extracted peatland sites and development of land use management strategies.
PhD 2: Investigations into the distal downstream influence of peat extraction and peat drainage activities on the physico-chemical composition and biodiversity of associated aquatic habitats.
PhD 3: Modelling of the effects of drainage and water treatment on the hydrology, hydro-morphology and hydrochemistry of industrial cutaway peatlands.

Project Principal Investigators: Dr Florence Renou-Wilson (UCD - Peatland Scientist); Ass. Prof. Mary Kelly-Quinn (UCD- Freshwater Ecologist); Ass. Prof. Fiachra O’Loughlin (UCD- Hydrological modelling), Prof. Michael Bruen (UCD- Prof. of Environmental Hydrology) and Dr Shane Regan (NPWS – Eco-hydrologist). Other partners are Ass. Prof Shane Donohue (UCD – Geotechnical engineering), Dr Josephine Treacy (Limerick IT – Analytical scientist) and Dr Connie O’Driscoll (Ecologist at Ryan Hanley).

Further information can be found here.

 

Universities Ireland North/South Postgraduate Scholarships

The aim of this scheme is to encourage outstanding students from the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland to cross the border to undertake postgraduate study and experience life in the other Irish jurisdiction.  This year, Universities Ireland offers will offer five scholarships, each worth €15,000, to students who have been accepted to undertake a recognised Master’s Degree or are entering the first year of a PhD programme at a university in the island of Ireland that is not in the same jurisdiction as the university where they have previously studied.

Application forms are available on the Universities Ireland website. More Information can be found here.

Contact Details: crossborder@qub.ac.uk. Deadline to submit an application is Thursday 16th May 2019 before 4pm.

 

Flaherty Research Scholarship: Supporting emerging research scholars, whose work has the potential to link Canada and Ireland.

This award supports a short research visit of four to six weeks, and is designed to help scholars make contacts with researchers working in related research topics, with a view to widening and deepening the scholar’s research horizons, ideally leading to continued collaboration in future research.

If you are a PhD student or post-doctoral academic in the early stages of your research career, you may be eligible for the this scholarship. More information can be found here.

For more information on the Program, click here.

 

Medical Traineeships in Human Anatomy

This is a one-year (or possible extension for the duration of research degree) full-time scholarship Programme. Successful candidates will undertake a graduate research degree while gaining skills and experience teaching functional and clinical anatomy to medical and allied health students. Strong academic skills and competency in Anatomy are desirable as part of the selection criteria, along with proficient communication skills. Prior clinical training is desirable but not a mandatory requirement.

More information can be found www.ucd.ie/medicine/anatomy

Medical Traineeship in Human Anatomy 2019

 

Informal queries and application should be sent to anatomy@ucd.ie

Closing date for applications is Monday 22nd April (5pm).

 

PhD Position

The UCD School of Psychology is pleased to invite applications for a fully-funded PhD scholarship, to commence in September 2019. The successful candidate will complete a structured four-year programme of PhD studies under the supervision of Dr Cliódhna O’Connor. The student will be expected to develop an original and independent research project that coheres with Dr O’Connor’s research programme exploring the social and psychological implications of psychiatric diagnosis. There is considerable scope to shape the project according to the interest and expertise of the student. Possible projects may involve topics such as:

  • Diagnostic transitions in child or adult mental healthcare
  • The lived experience of receiving a psychiatric diagnosis
  • Issues in the comorbid diagnosis of ASD and mental health difficulties
  • Health professionals’ attitudes and approaches to diagnosis of mental health conditions
  • Public understanding of and attitudes towards psychiatric diagnosis
  • Biological essentialism of mental health disorders.

The scholarship is generously funded by the UCD ADVANCE PhD scheme. The award includes a full fee waiver, a stipend of €15,000 per annum, a computer/laptop, and research/travel expenses of €2,725 per annum. Applications are open to both EU and non-EU students. The candidate will benefit from a supportive working environment, tailored training in generic and project-specific research skills, and opportunities for travel to international conferences and networking events.

Applicants should hold an excellent academic record that includes an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline. Applicants with relevant postgraduate qualifications will be preferred. Knowledge and experience of both quantitative and qualitative research techniques is essential. The position would suit a highly motivated student who possesses the ability to work both independently and collaboratively.

Applications should be submitted by email to Dr Cliódhna O’Connor (cliodhna.oconnor1@ucd.ie) by 12pm on the 20th May 2019. Application packages should include:

  • Cover letter (max 1 page)
  • CV (including contact details for two academic references)
  • Academic transcripts (showing all grades received to date)
  • 1500-word project proposal (please note that this need not definitely be the project you will conduct if successful, but should demonstrate your ability to identify a compelling research rationale, feasible research question, and credible and appropriate methodological approach).

Shortlisted applicants will be called to interview in June. After the successful candidate has been identified, they will be required to apply for formal admission to UCD’s structured PhD programme and demonstrate they meet the University’s minimum admissions criteria, including English language proficiency where relevant. International applicants are welcome.

Informal enquiries should be directed to Dr Cliódhna O’Connor at cliodhna.oconnor1@ucd.ie.

 

SFI Centre for Research Training in Machine Learning - PhD positions available

UCD School of Computer Science are delighted at the recent announcement of the new SFI Centre for Research Training in Machine Learning. The Centre is a collaboration between three Dublin universities (UCD, DCU, and TUD) and over the coming years will train over a hundred PhD students in machine learning research.

The UCD leaders of the Centre are Dr. Brian Mac Namee and Dr. Georgiana Ifrim, both from the School of Computer Science. There are currently 57 potential PhD supervisors associated with the Centre, including many from the UCD School of Computer ScienceResearch topics for PhD students will range from fundamental questions in machine learning, to applications of machine learning in fields as diverse as health and finance, to understanding ethical issues associated with the use of machine learning in society.

There are 19 different Irish based companies, both SMEs and multinationals, that have an active interest in machine learning and are partnering in the Centre. In addition to their academic work, every student will complete a placement as part of their PhD. Typically, these placements will last 3-6 months and will be with industry partners or an international research group.

The centre is currently recruiting the first cohort of PhD students to start in September 2019. All students will receive a generous scholarship (€18,500 per annum) and have their tuition fees fully covered. There are two deadlines for applicants - Sunday March 31st and Tuesday April 30th. Application details are available here.

 

PhD programme in Metallurgical Challenges for the Digital Manufacturing Environment

 Do you want to graduate with a globally competitive PhD in an area that is transforming Ireland's economy? Do you want to work on a challenging project in partnership with industry? I-Form is looking for the brightest maths, science and engineering graduates to join the Centre for Doctoral Training in Metallurgical Challenges for the Digital Manufacturing Environment from September 2019. The Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) brings together a group of PhD students from diverse backgrounds to tackle today's evolving issues and future challenges in an exciting environment, linked with industry and supporting broad skills development in areas such as responsible innovation, leadership, science in the media and industrial training.

Being part of this innovative training network means:

  •  Cohort based training across four academic sites with PhDs working side-by-side on industry relevant projects
  • Time embedded with industry partners
  • Graduating with a broad set of professional leadership skills alongside your doctoral research

The four universities involved are: University College Dublin, Dublin City University, University of Sheffield and University of Manchester.

If you are interested in a PhD in the following areas in the metallic manufacturing sector, then send your CV or email queries to cdt@i-form.ie:

  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Advanced Manufacturing (e.g. laser processing, joining technologies etc)
  • Innovative product and process design
  • Data capture, process monitoring & control
  • Design for manufacturing

(Please note, the funding awarded for this programme covers EU student fees only.) Relevant website

  

PhD position in Tactile Biomechanics and Neuroscience: How Do Humans Feel Friction?

Background: Prosthetic and robotic hands demonstrate poor dexterity during object manipulation, often dropping objects. Humans rarely allow objects to slip because we can sense if an object is slippery and adjust our grip. In recent years, while we have learned more about the biomechanics and neuroscience underpinning our ability to sense friction, there is still much to learn. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given how poorly we understand human friction sensing, very little research has been directed at replicating this ability to sense friction or slipperiness in artificial sensors. This research program has three work packages: (WP1) To advance our understanding of how humans sense friction; (WP2) To demonstrate, using a number of friction-based tactile sensor prototypes currently under development by our research group, that friction sensing leads to improved dexterity in robotic manipulation; (WP3) To use advanced design, manufacturing, and instrumentation methods to miniaturise the proposed sensors to a scale similar to a human finger pad. The outcomes of this research, which would endow artificial hands with the ability to feel the slipperiness and/or impending loss of grip of a grasped object, could significantly advance the fields of prosthetics, telesurgery, and service, agricultural, and manufacturing robotics.

PhD scope: The candidate will work on WP1 of this project, performing biomechanical and microneurographic studies of the human sense of touch to discover the mechanisms by which frictional information about the contact interface between the finger pad and a manipulated object is transduced by the skin of the finger pad, and subsequently encoded and signalled to the brain by tactile afferents. The biomechanical studies will involve video processing of relative movement between the skin and the object surface, and this movement (and associated forces) related to friction. Microneurography, using microelectrodes placed in the median nerve at the level of the wrist, will be used to record the responses of single tactile afferents in response to localised biomechanical events, which in turn are influenced by frictional properties – this demonstrates whether friction-related biomechanical events (such as localised slips) can be detected by our mechanoreceptors. Robotic actuators will be used (with support from additional technical and research staff) to manipulate the skin of the finger pad. Advance statistical methods, including machine learning techniques, will be used to decode the ensemble of neural recordings, highlighting which biomechanical events are important to our sensation of friction.

Supervision and research environment: The candidate will be supervised by A/Prof Stephen Redmond (School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering: http://www.ucd.ie/eleceng/) and Prof James Jones (School of Medicine: http://www.ucd.ie/medicine/). The candidate will spend time training with A/Prof Ingvars Birznieks at UNSW (Sydney, Australia) to develop skills in the technique of microneurography. Neurological recordings will be performed in Dublin under the guidance of Prof Jones, and in collaboration with Neurology Research Group at St Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin. The candidate will interact with the other work packages or the project. The candidate will also have the opportunity to contribute to the SFI Insight Centre for Data Analytics (http://www.insight-centre.org/) based at UCD.

Funding: A stipend of 18,500 per annum plus tuition fee is available for a maximum of four years. The project is generously funded by Science Foundation Ireland’s President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award, held by A/Prof Redmond, which includes an extensive budget for laboratory apparatus, consumables, and travel. The tactile sensor design work packages are also partly supported by US Office of Naval Research Global funding held by A/Prof Redmond and Dr Heba Khamis at UNSW (Sydney, Australia).

Academic requirements: The minimum academic qualification is a first- or upper-second-class honours degree (or an equivalent international degree) in neuroscience, neurophysiology, biomedical engineering, or a sufficiently related field.

Contact: Please send CV and cover letter to Stephen Redmond: stephen.redmond@ucd.ie

 

PhD position in Miniaturisation of a Novel Friction-Sensing Tactile Sensor

Background: Prosthetic and robotic hands demonstrate poor dexterity during object manipulation, often dropping objects. Humans rarely allow objects to slip because we can sense if an object is slippery and adjust our grip. In recent years, while we have learned more about the biomechanics and neuroscience underpinning our ability to sense friction, there is still much to learn. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given how poorly we understand human friction sensing, very little research has been directed at replicating this ability to sense friction or slipperiness in artificial sensors. This research program has three work packages: (WP1) To advance our understanding of how humans sense friction; (WP2) To demonstrate, using a number of friction-based tactile sensor prototypes currently under development by our research groups in Dublin and Sydney, that friction sensing leads to improved dexterity in robotic manipulation; (WP3) To use advanced design, manufacturing, and instrumentation methods to miniaturise the proposed sensors to a scale similar to a human finger pad. The outcomes of this research, which would endow artificial hands with the ability to feel the slipperiness and/or impending loss of grip of a grasped object, could significantly advance the fields of prosthetics, telesurgery, and service, agricultural, and manufacturing robotics.

PhD scope: The candidate will work on WP3 of this project, refining and miniaturising the existing tactile sensor design concepts under development at UCD (Dublin, Ireland) and UNSW (Sydney, Australia). See demo: https://youtu.be/BGUe_tqjaBA. We have developed a novel optical technique to instrument silicone protrusions which resemble the papillae found in the skin of the human finger pad. We can measure forces and displacements with excellent accuracy (millinewtons and micrometres, respectively). Creating a dense array of such protrusion allows us to approximate the biomechanics of the human pad, and possibly exceed its sensitivity; the human finger has an effective density of about 500 sensing elements across the finger pad. In addition to measuring contact forces, torques, vibration, and slip, the proposed design concept ultimately allows us to sense the friction of the contact without ever completely losing the grasp. The candidate will miniaturise the proposed tactile sensor (robot finger pad) design using advanced sub-millimetre manufacturing techniques; by creating a dense array of deformable sensing elements, and by developing novel light generation and detection optoelectronic circuits which are both suitable for mass production and operate effectively at the proposed device dimensions. The candidate will demonstrate that this miniaturised design retains the ability to estimate friction from slip events on the periphery of the finger pad before complete loss of grip occurs.

Supervision and research environment: The candidate will be supervised by A/Prof Stephen Redmond (School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, UCD https://people.ucd.ie/stephen.redmond). The candidate will also collaborate with Dr Heba Khamis at UNSW (Sydney, Australia). The candidate will have an opportunity to contribute to the SFI Insight Centre for Data Analytics (http://www.insight-centre.org/) based at UCD. There are ongoing commercialisation activities around this technology, to which the candidate can contribute.

Funding: A stipend of 18,500 per annum plus tuition fee is available for a maximum of four years. The project is generously funded by Science Foundation Ireland’s President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award, held by A/Prof Redmond, which includes an extensive budget for laboratory apparatus, consumables, and travel. Both tactile sensor design work packages are also partly supported by US Office of Naval Research Global funding held by A/Prof Redmond and Dr Heba Khamis at UNSW (Sydney, Australia).

Academic requirements: The minimum academic qualification is a first- or upper-second-class honours degree (or an equivalent international degree) in electrical engineering, software engineering, computer engineering, mechanical or mechatronic engineering, biomedical engineering, robotics, or a related field which provides sufficient background in the skills required for the successful completion of this project. Desirable skills include knowledge of, or experience with: 3D printers; six-axis robotic arms; six-axis hexapod robotic stages; robotic grippers; machining/moulding/assembly of bespoke mechanical and electrical equipment; development of real-time control software; real-time data acquisition (SPI, etc.); collection and analysis of experimental data and results.  

Contact: Please send CV and cover letter to Stephen Redmond: stephen.redmond@ucd.ie

 

PhD in Tactile Sensor Design and Friction-Based Robotic Gripping

Background: Prosthetic and robotic hands demonstrate poor dexterity during object manipulation, often dropping objects. Humans rarely allow objects to slip because we can sense if an object is slippery and adjust our grip. In recent years, while we have learned more about the biomechanics and neuroscience underpinning our ability to sense friction, there is still much to learn. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given how poorly we understand human friction sensing, very little research has been directed at replicating this ability to sense friction or slipperiness in artificial sensors. This research program has three work packages: (WP1) To advance our understanding of how humans sense friction; (WP2) To demonstrate, using a number of friction-based tactile sensor prototypes currently under development by our research groups in Dublin and Sydney, that friction sensing leads to improved dexterity in robotic manipulation; (WP3) To use advanced design, manufacturing, and instrumentation methods to miniaturise the proposed sensors to a scale similar to a human finger pad. The outcomes of this research, which would endow artificial hands with the ability to feel the slipperiness and/or impending loss of grip of a grasped object, could significantly advance the fields of prosthetics, telesurgery, and service, agricultural, and manufacturing robotics.

PhD scope: The candidate will work on WP2 of this project, refining existing tactile sensor prototypes under development at UCD (Dublin, Ireland) and UNSW (Sydney, Australia). See demo: https://youtu.be/BGUe_tqjaBA. We have developed a novel optical technique to instrument silicone protrusions which resemble the papillae found in the skin of the human finger pad. We can measure forces and displacements with excellent accuracy (millinewtons and micrometres, respectively). Creating an array of such protrusion allows us to approximate the biomechanics of the human pad, and possibly exceed its sensitivity; in addition to measuring contact forces, torques, vibration, and slip, this ultimately allows us to sense the friction of the contact without ever completely losing the grasp. The candidate will refine this large-scale prototype, increasing the number of pillars in the array, and reducing the overall size of the array (i.e., “finger pad”). By developing a force-controlled robotic gripper which takes estimated forces, torques and friction as its input, the candidate will demonstrate that dexterity in object manipulation can be improved using this friction-sensing tactile sensor – show the robot drops the object less often.

Supervision and research environment: The candidate will be supervised by A/Prof Stephen Redmond (School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, UCD https://people.ucd.ie/stephen.redmond). The candidate will also collaborate with Dr Heba Khamis at UNSW (Sydney, Australia). The candidate will also have an opportunity to contribute to the SFI Insight Centre for Data Analytics (http://www.insight-centre.org/) based at UCD.

Funding: A stipend of 18,500 per annum plus tuition fee is available for a maximum of four years. The project is generously funded by Science Foundation Ireland’s President of Ireland Future Research Leaders Award, held by A/Prof Redmond, which includes an extensive budget for laboratory apparatus, consumables, and travel. Both tactile sensor design work packages are also partly supported by US Office of Naval Research Global funding held by A/Prof Redmond and Dr Heba Khamis at UNSW (Sydney, Australia).

Academic requirements: The minimum academic qualification is a first- or upper-second-class honours degree (or an equivalent international degree) in electrical engineering, software engineering, computer engineering, mechanical or mechatronic engineering, biomedical engineering, robotics, or a related field which provides sufficient background in the skills required for the successful completion of this project. Desirable skills include knowledge of, or experience with: 3D printers; six-axis robotic arms; six-axis hexapod robotic stages; robotic grippers; machining/moulding/assembly of bespoke mechanical and electrical equipment; development of real-time control software; real-time data acquisition (SPI, etc.); collection and analysis of experimental data and results.  

Contact: Please send CV and cover letter to Stephen Redmond: stephen.redmond@ucd.ie

 

PhD studentship available in the area of “Coded Sparse Signaling for Massive MIMO Communications” - UCD Communications and Signal Processing Research Group

Massive MIMO is a key technology for 5G-and-beyond wireless networks, which is capable of dramatically increasing both the spectral efficiency and the energy efficiency of the network. This project will design new transmitters and receivers as well as advanced signal processing algorithms for massive MIMO systems, based on the concept of sparse signaling, also known as generalized spatial modulation. The research will center on the joint design of channel coding, generalized spatial modulation, and receiver signal processing (channel estimation, compressed-sensing based signal detection, and iterative channel decoding). The new communication system designs will be validated by extensive mathematical analysis as well as by simulation. Channel coding techniques will center on state-of-the-art LDPC and polar code constructions, as these provide excellent performance advantages as well as low-complexity implementations. Interactions between the compressed-sensing based front-end detection process and the iterative channel decoder will be a key focus of the receiver design problem. The research will be conducted under the supervision of Associate Professor Mark Flanagan in conjunction with international academic collaborators.

Requirements: The successful candidate should hold a Bachelors or Masters degree (First or Upper Second Class Honors) in electronic/communication engineering, computer science or a related discipline, and should possess a very strong background in mathematics, communication theory, signal processing and programming. Excellent writing and oral communication skills are also required. Stipend: The postgraduate scholarship covers the full university tuition fees and also carries a stipend of €18,500 per annum (tax free).

The position will remain open until filled. Applications should be sent by email to Associate Professor Mark Flanagan (mark.flanagan@ieee.org) and should include: (1)  Curriculum Vitae, (2)  Copies of all Transcripts, (3)  An English Test Certificate (for non-native English speakers), (4)  Contact details of two Referees (email and phone number).

 

Northern Hemisphere Summer Research Scholarships 

The University of Auckland (member of Universitas 21) is offering 5 scholarships to UCD students who wish to engage in a summer research programme. This programme is only open to students from selected international universities. Further information can be found here.

 

PhD Studentship Neuromuscular Systems: Multi-Domain Lifestyle Targets for Improving ProgNOsis in Huntington’s Disease

Applications are invited for a PhD studentship funded through the EU Joint Programme – Neurodegenerative Disease Research (JPND) and Health Research Board (HRB) with the Neuromuscular Systems Research Lab at University College Dublin. This project is in collaboration with a network of European Partners, including the Centre for Trials Research (CTR), Cardiff University.

The PhD candidate will develop and validate signal processing algorithms for capturing physical activity in Huntington’s disease (HD) patients using wearable sensors. HD is a progressive, life-limiting neurodegenerative disease. It has serious consequences for the individual and their families. No current treatment to modify the course of the disease exists. Improved evidence-based symptom assessment is crucial to optimising disease management. This project aims to identify key environmental factors (physical activity, sleep activity and nutrition) that may be responsive in targeted interventions with a view towards optimising disease management for individuals with HD.  The PhD applicant will have the opportunity to travel to other European project partner’s research facilities. The project will commence in May/Sept 2019. 

Applicants should have, or expect to obtain, a first or upper second class honours Bachelors or Masters degree in Electrical, Electronic or Biomedical Engineering (or a related discipline).  Suitable candidates will have a strong interest in biomedical/neural engineering and neuroscience. Excellent analytical, computational and communications skills are essential. Experience in wearable sensing, data analysis and predictive modelling are also an advantage.

The PhD studentship covers tuition fees for EU applicants and a tax free stipend of €18,000 per year. An annual allowance is provided for research consumables and for conference attendance.

To apply, please send a cover letter describing your experience and interest in this project (1 page max), CV, and academic transcripts to

Professor Madeleine Lowery

UCD School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering

University College Dublin

Belfield

Dublin 4

Ireland

Email: neuromuscular@ucd.ie or aoife.ogorman@ucd.ie

Website: www.neuromuscularsystemsucd.info

 

MEngSc (Research) - Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) Design for EIRSAT-1 Ireland's first Satellite

This research masters will focus on the development of Attitude Determination and Control Systems(ADCS)for EIRSAT-1, Ireland's first Satellite. The mission will test and compare two separate ADCS algorithms while in orbit. One off the shelf ADCS and a second novel control scheme developed in UCD. The CubeSat will utilise a 3-axis magnetorquer set up for actuation and a gyro/magnetometer/sun sensor arrangement for attitude determination.  These need to be tested and verified before launch, through simulation and hardware in the loop testing.

The role will have the following responsibilities:

  • Continued development of a space environment simulation for 2U CubeSat in low earth orbit
  • Controller implementation for satellite detumbling and pointing
  • Testing and verification of the ADCS through hardware in the loop testing
  • Create and maintain test plan and test specification documentation
  • Develop new ADCS hardware for future missions

Requirements

  • Undergraduate degree in Engineering or Science
  • High standard of spoken and written English
  • Ability to work to deadlines and work as part of an interdisciplinary team

The successful applicant will join the Dynamics and Control Systems Group based in UCD School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. The group has 8 years of experience working of projects with the European Space Agency controlling the flexibility in space structures ranging from launchers, to X-ray telescopes and robotics arms. EIRSAT-1 is a 2U CubeSat being built, tested and operated by University College Dublin as part of the European Space Agency’s Fly Your Satellite! programme.

For informal enquiries contact: Professor David J. Browne at david.mckeown@ucd.ie.

Interested applicants should send a CV, together with a cover letter to Professor David J. Browne at david.mckeown@ucd.ie.

 

MEngSc (Research) - Design, Testing and Verification of a CubeSat antenna deployment module

This research masters will focus on the testing and verification of the Antenna Deployment Module (ADM) for EIRSAT-1, Ireland's first Satellite. The ADM stores two dipole antennae during launch and deploys the antennae upon reaching a safe from the international space station. Successful deployment allows communication to be established between the ground station and the satellite and is therefore a mission critical element of the design.

The ADM has been full designed and manufactured in UCD and requires through testing and verification, and possible redesign of the deployment mechanism, before flight.

The role will have the following responsibilities:

  • Oversee manufacturing the of Antenna Deployment Module
  • Assembly and integration of the ADM in a cleanroom environment
  • Design and build a test procedure and specification plan for the ADM
  • Low temperature testing of the ADM
  • Oversee the vibration test campaign
  • Create and maintain test plan and test specification documentation

Requirements

  • Undergraduate degree in Engineering or Science
  • High standard of spoken and written English
  • Ability to work to deadlines and work as part of an interdisciplinary team

The successful applicant will join the Dynamics and Control Systems Group based in UCD School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. The group has 8 years of experience working of projects with the European Space Agency controlling the flexibility in space structures ranging from launchers, to X-ray telescopes and robotics arms. EIRSAT-1 is a 2U CubeSat being built, tested and operated by University College Dublin as part of the European Space Agency’s Fly Your Satellite! Programme.

For informal enquiries contact: Professor David J. Browne at david.mckeown@ucd.ie.

Interested applicants should send a CV, together with a cover letter to Professor David J. Browne at david.mckeown@ucd.ie.

 

2 x PhD Opportunities - Solidification of Metallic Alloys

4-year scholarships to cover PhD fees, stipend, and travel expenses.

Two new PhD opportunities are immediately available for suitably qualified candidates. One is sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA), the other by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) as part of the I-Form Research Centre based at UCD.

1.     ESA project on alloy solidification in space

UCD has been involved over a number of years in ESA-funded research on the effects of gravity on alloy solidification – which is important in manufacturing processes such as casting, welding and additive manufacturing. In particular, funding is now available for a PhD student to work on a project (called XRMON) on X-Ray MONitoring of solidification processes in space. This will include design, execution and analysis of experiments on short-duration microgravity facilities like parabolic fights and sounding rockets, with plans currently being made for long-duration experiments on the International Space Station. It is envisaged that the student will have the opportunity to experience zero gravity directly and personally by participating in an ESA parabolic flight campaign.  

2.     I-Form project on Additive Manufacturing with Metals

The new I-Form Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre, funded by Science Foundation Ireland and based at UCD, will draw together research expertise from academia and industry to deliver innovation in Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques and processes. I-Form research combines novel metrology, materials science, computational modelling, data analytics and control theory to achieve significantly enhanced AM processing efficiency for metals and polymers.

For AM of metallic alloys, we will develop and validate new models for the simulation of powder flow, metal melting, melt flow, metal solidification, and microstructure evolution, as well as constitutive models of resulting mechanical properties. The overall goal is to deliver a process-structure-property through-process model for the first time. As part of this new research programme, Prof. David Browne is recruiting a PhD student to work on the computational modelling of the melting and solidification phenomena which occur layer-by-layer in 3D printing involving scanning a bed of metal alloy powder particles with laser or electron beams .

Expertise and Education required

Upper Honours Bachelors or Masters degree in Mechanical Engineering, Materials Engineering, or Metallurgy. The candidate should have excellent communication skills – written and oral – in English, good mathematical, experimental and computer skills, and be capable of team-work.

Interested graduates, or current final year students, should send their CV, indicating preferred PhD project, along with a cover letter, to:

Professor David J. Browne

School of Mechanical & Materials Engineering

University College Dublin

Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland,

Tel. +353 1 716 1901                                    

preferably via email: david.browne@ucd.ie

 

PhD Positions in Active Distribution Systems Management, Distributed Energy Resources and associated Power Electronics.
Driven by concerns of climate change, the electricity industry is in the midst of a revolution with increasing connections of variable renewable generation. Much of this is being connected as distributed generation (DG) to the medium voltage (MV) or low voltage (LV) distribution network. At the same time, electricity consumers are encouraged to become producers (prosumers) and new energy resources such as electrical storage and active demand side management, are increasingly being proposed as solutions to offset variability. This also comes at a time when the electrification of transport and heating is poised to add significant new loads to the systems. All of these changes point to a radically new technical composition for the distribution grid with a proliferation of potentially new controllable, distributed energy resources (DER).
This aim of this research is to explore new approaches to the operation of the distribution network with a particular focus on exploiting the controllability of power electronics devices (e.g. DER smart Inverters, Smart Transformers) to aid in active management.
We are currently seeking excellent candidates to fill four PhD Positions in the following areas:

• 2 PhD positions in topics related to control of power electronics including smart inverters, power electronics transformers for network control, real time simulation with hardware in the loop. These positions are under the primary supervision of Assoc. Prof. Terence O’Donnell (terence.odonnell@ucd.ie )

• 2 PhD positions in topics related to active distribution system management, control of distributed energy resources, and system level integration and management of power electronics devices. These positions are under the primary supervision of Assoc. Prof. Andrew Keane (andrew.keane@ucd.ie )

Successful candidates will be part of a larger team of researchers based in the UCD Energy Institute and UCD School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. The UCD Energy Institute is a multi-disciplinary energy institute with a focus on energy research and its translation to policies and impacts that address the challenge of decarbonisation.
The PhD positions will be for a duration of 4 years, with a stipend: of €18,500 per year.
Applicants should send their CV, including academic grades and a cover letter, outlining their motivation for pursuing a PhD, their particular interest in this research and any ideas they may have for specific research projects within this area.
CVs and cover letters should be sent to:
Assoc. Prof. Andrew Keane (andrew.keane@ucd.ie )
Assoc. Prof. Terence O’Donnell (terence.odonnell@ucd.ie )

 

Control and Optimization for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles

One Ph.D. position is available at the Systems and Control Group within the School of Electric and Electronic Engineering of the University College Dublin. The Ph.D. student will work under the supervision of Dr. Giovanni Russo (email: giovanni.russo1@ucd.ie) and will be jointly supervised by Prof. Robert Shorten (robert.shorten@ucd.ie).

For this position, we are seeking candidates for our mobility work with the Science Foundation Ireland Research Center Lero (https://www.sfi.ie/sfi-research-centres/lero/). The project seeks to develop closed loop strategies, leveraging Distributed Ledger Technology, for the control of autonomous and connected vehicles. The work will be aimed at developing novel tools from nonlinear dynamics, distributed optimization and AI to design collaborative services within vehicles. The research will have both a theoretical and applied, hands-on, aspect.

The ideal candidate should have a background in:
1. nonlinear dynamics and complex systems;
2. intelligent transportation;
3. optimization;
4. statistics.

To apply:
Send a cover letter stating your interest in the position and your CV to giovanni.russo1@ucd.ie. Pre-applications and informal inquiries can be made to Dr Giovanni Russo.

 

School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

A. Sharing Economy Systems

We are seeking excellent candidates to work in the following areas as part of a sharing economy project. Currently we have 5 Ph.D. positions and one Postdoc position available in the following areas.

1. Dimensioning and control of Sharing Economy System

2. Congestion management and behavioural analytics for Sharing Economy Systems

3. Human-in-the-loop data-science

4. Blockchain and DAGS for high frequency sharing economy micropayments

5. Design of Cyber-Physical Systems

The positions will involve the development of theory at the interface of control theory, statistics, economics, and computer science, as well as the realisation of a number of practical (mobility based) demonstrators. Some of the research will be conducted in collaboration with IBM Research, with potential for significant interaction with other industrial companies.

B. Advanced Manufacturing

We have one Ph.D.  position in the area of cyber-physical systems for 3D manufacturing applications. The focus of the positions will be in the area of cooperative control involving humans and machines, as well as cognitive computing with a focus of operator-machine optimisation. This is part of the new I-FORM centre. 

C. Automotive 

We are also seeking candidates for our mobility work in the context of the Enable-S3 project and for our work with Lero. The project seeks to develop tools to test and evaluate autonomous vehicles, and to develop distributed control/optimization algorithms for connected car projects. As part of both of these projects we will also explore closed loop design of recommender systems.

To apply

Applications should be submitted to robert.shorten@ucd.ie. Applicants should submit a CV and the names of 3 referees. All Ph.D. candidates will be expected to fulfil the English language requirements for admission to the Ph.D. programme at University College Dublin.

For further information, please contact robert.shorten@ucd.ie or refer to https://robertshorten.com/vacancies/. All positions are funded by Science Foundation Ireland.

 

PhD in Expert system modelling of cattle disease management in modern livestock populations, in the context of an Irish IBR eradication programme

The UCD Centre for Veterinary Epidemiology and Risk Analysis, in collaboration with Animal Health Ireland and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig, Germany, seeks a PhD candidate for a position within their extant collaboration.

The PhD studentship will be registered with the University of Leipzig and based at the UFZ in Leipzig in Germany, and the candidate will join a vibrant team of about 50 modellers in life science, including the EcoEpi lab which specialises in modelling for animal health. The candidate will develop the Irish IBR model from basic farm level towards a regional complex system model with fine-scale network interactions and social decision components.

Applicants are required to hold an excellent Master’s Degree or equivalent university degree in life science, geography, physics, social sciences, computer science or related fields, among other skills outlined in the IBR PhD Ad.

Stipend:  €18,000 in year 1, rising by €500 per annum to €20,000 in year 4.

Registration fees in the University of Leipzig and project-related travel expenses are included in addition to this stipend.

Applications must include the following:

(i)       A covering letter detailing their interest and reasons for applying for this position

(ii)      A CV (including contact details of 2 referees)

(iii)     A summary of any relevant research experience

(iv)     A reference ‘PhD Studentship IBR’ on the subject line.

To apply, and for further information, please contact: nmorgan@animalhealthireland.ie

 

Intel Masters Student Scholarships

This sponsorship programme sees up to 16 UCD students selected each year each to receive a monetary grant as well as ongoing support and mentor provision by Intel. The eligible students are those beginning full time Masters programmes in Science and Engineering related disciplines. The programme provides each participant with €3000 to support their academic studies and also ensures that students have the opportunity to experience practical learning which is aligned to the needs of industry. The provision of employee mentors by Intel provides students with a direct relationship to the world of work.

More Information can be found here.