Overview

States have a right under international law to limit access by non-citizens to a state. However, this right is necessarily limited and prescribed. Immigration and asylum law raise questions regarding the ability of states to regulate or control in-ward migration for certain categories of non-citizen. This course offers both law and non-law students and other professionals, an opportunity to critically assess international, European and Irish immigration and asylum law, politics and rights. Topics covered may include:

(i) Asylum Seekers in International, European and Irish Law; 
(ii) The Politics of Immigration; 
(iii) The Socio-Economic Rights of Migrants; 
(iv) The Politics of Family Migration Law; 
(v) Migrant Workers and the Law; 
(vi) Irregular Migration, and;
(vii) Immigration and Asylum Advocacy.

 
The course will be delivered by means of blended learning: face to face interaction, participant engagement and discussion, coupled with e-learning. Students will have access to a wide range of resources in order to excel in the fascinating area of politics, law and human rights. The innovative assessment methods will provide students with opportunities to engage in high level research on immigration and asylum for leading international and national migration organisations.
Immigration & Asylum: Law, Politics & Rights is designed for both law and non-law students. With profound changes expected to the Irish immigration and asylum systems over the coming years, this course will be useful to a wide variety of individuals. A sound knowledge and understanding of the legal rules and principles that have evolved to govern immigration and asylum law is useful and necessary for all persons operating in government, national and international governmental organisations, politics, business, as practising lawyers, policy makers, or as rights advocates within the international and national non-governmental sector (NGOs). 

 

What will I learn?

 

Upon successful completion of this module, diligent students should be able to:

(i) Identify the key principles underpinning immigration and asylum law at the international, European and national level;
(ii) Demonstrate knowledge of the different legal regimes pertaining to an individual’s immigration status;
(iii) Consider the politics of immigration and asylum within international and domestic settings;
(iv) Evaluate the effectiveness or otherwise of human rights protections for migrants and asylum seekers; 
(v) Comprehend, discuss and challenge the functions and purpose of immigration controls at the international, European and national level;
(vi) Illustrate the rationale behind recent legislative innovations in immigration and asylum law, politics and rights within international, European and national systems, in a comparative manner; and,
(vii) Engage in independent and/or specified high level research on issues relating to immigration and asylum law, politics and human rights. 

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To obtain further information and application details please contact:

Justine McCann

Graduate Programme Administrator
T: +353 1 716 4109 
E: lawdiplomas@ucd.ie

Week Starting    

  Day  

 Start Time    

  Length

25 Jan 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

01 Feb 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

08 Feb 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

15 Feb 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

22 Feb 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

29 Feb 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

07 Mar 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

28 Mar 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

04 Apr 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

11 Apr 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

18 Apr 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins

25 Apr 2016

Wed

16:00

110mins



% of Final Grade

 Timing

 

 

 

Continuous Assessment: 3 x Research Notes (max. 750 words each) on specified readings/case law

35

Throughout the Semester

 

   

Presentation: Pecha Kucha Presentation on Project

15

Varies over the Semester

 

   

Project: 5000 word (maximum) research project: This may be on an topic (and format) agreed by the lecturer and student

50

Coursework (End of Semester)