UCD School of Physics Seminars

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Archive of previous seminars:


 

Public Lecture

August 26th 2021 @ 7pm via Zoom

Quantum physics and quantum technologies

Prof. Klaus Mølmer 

Aarhus University

 

Many fundamental theories of physics have later resulted in important technological revolutions e.g. engines and refrigerators from thermodynamics or modern electronics from electromagnetism. The seemingly exotic rules of quantum mechanics are providing remarkable new opportunities in this respect; recent decades have witnessed tremendous experimental progress in preparing systems which are so small and isolated that they can only be accurately described using quantum mechanics. Once questioned as the evidence of a potential fundamental flaw in the theory, quantum superposition and entanglement are now established physical phenomena and, remarkably, are ushering in a new wave of devices which utilise these distinctly quantum mechanical effects as resources. It is clear that the science underlying quantum enhanced devices is sufficiently mature that it is now making the transition from academic enterprise to commercialisation.

No prior physics knowledge is needed, Prof. Klaus Mølmer will take you on a journey from fundamental physics right through the exciting new possibilities of the coming (second) quantum revolution!

This talk is available to watchback on youtube from the following link: YouTube - Public Lecture

 

Colloquium

July 15th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom

Witnesses of non-classicality beyond quantum theory

Dr. Chiara Marletto 

University of Oxford

 
The theory of quantum computation has brought us rapid technological developments, together with remarkable improvements in how we understand quantum theory. I will describe the foundations of a programme to extend the quantum theory of computation beyond quantum theory itself, based on the recently proposed constructor theory. I will then explain a recent application of this new approach to the problem of witnessing quantum effects in gravity.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Seminar + Info Session

June 10th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom

Workshop Workshop
The Joys of Making Toys in the UCD School of Physics

UCD Workshop Team 

School of Physics UCD

 
The School of Physics finds itself sandwiched between the third floor Electronics Workshop and the Mechanical Workshops on the ground. In between, for about 57 years, Physicists have come up with undergraduate experiments, lecture demonstration setups, and research tools they want to build,
and the Workshops are where the waves of imagination crash against the rocks of reality and solutions are born. If you want to know more about what work goes on there, what tools are available and how to get started making things, the two workshops will present themselves and their capabilities, with plenty of time for questions afterwards.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

May 27th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom

Physics of extreme ultraviolet light sources and their role in the semiconductor industry

Dr. John Sheil 

Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography

The semiconductor industry is at the core of today’s technology-driven society. Developments in this industry are driving the production of ever-smaller yet ever-more powerful mobile devices and are responsible for advances in high performance computing capabilities. Photolithography, the process by which patterns are printed on silicon wafers to make integrated circuits, has very recently undergone a revolution. Light having a very short wavelength (13.5 nanometres) is now used in this printing process. This light is generated in a hot plasma formed when tin microdroplet targets are irradiated with high-intensity laser pulses. In this talk, I will give an overview of some of the key physics elements of this process.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Joint C-Space / C-QuEST Colloquium

Thursday May 13th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom 

Quantum Physics in Space

Prof. Mauro Paternostro 

Queen's University Belfast

Advances in quantum control and engineering are spurring a revolution in the way fundamental physics questions are explored at the empirical level. At the same time, they are the seeds for future disruptive technological applications of quantum mechanics. Remarkably, a space-based environment may open new avenues for both the development of quantum technologies and their use for fundamental and applied investigations. In this talk I will review such exciting combination of quantum physics and space applications: I will cover both fundamental scientific questions enhanced by the use of quantum technologies in space and the possible implementation of such technologies for a variety of academic and commercial purposes.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

Thursday April 29th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom [LINK]

Radiation-matter interaction, where atomic and molecular physics meet biology

Prof. Paola Bolognesi 

CNR-ISM

The effects and technological applications of radiation-matter interactions are widespread in our daily life, but we are often aware only of their macroscopic manifestations and ‘forget’ the origin of these effects, i.e. where and how such interactions occur. This understanding appears to be, and indeed it is, particularly complicated when biological systems as complex as living organisms and human beings are involved. In these systems the exposition to radiation can lead to a wide range of effects, spanning from cellular death and mutagenesis to photo- or radio-therapy in cancer treatments. Surprising as it might appear, the physical interaction and fundamental mechanisms at the heart of such apparently opposite outcomes are the same. They all begin at the ultrafast and ultrasmall scale of interaction of radiation with simple biomolecules like DNA bases and aminoacids, the building blocks of life. The difference between suffering an illness or curing it, relies on our understanding and capability to control the radiation- matter interaction, one of the most powerful and versatile tools in nature. In this seminar I’ll introduce a possible approach to the understanding of elementary processes in radiotherapy, introducing a chemical physics view of the radiosensitising mechanisms that in modern medicine aim to the development of more targeted and selective therapies.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

April 8th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom [LINK]

Proof of concept: recognition as a disruptive technology

Dr. Donal MacKernan 

UCD School of Physics

The transformation of a beautiful idea born via simulation into a commercial opportunity is recognised as a disruptive technology. At the heart of this ongoing story is advanced simulation using massively parallel computation, rare-event methods, genetic engineering, and a molecular switch developed in UCD with an initial application as a point-of-care medical diagnostic for COVID-19 and influenza.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

Thursday March 4th 2021 @ 2pm via Zoom

Scaling down the laws of thermodynamics

Prof. Christopher Jarzynski 

University of Maryland College Park

Thermodynamics provides a robust conceptual framework and set of laws that govern the exchange of energy and matter. Although these laws were originally articulated for macroscopic objects, nanoscale systems also exhibit “thermodynamic¬-like” behavior – for instance, biomolecular motors convert chemical fuel into mechanical work, and single molecules exhibit hysteresis when manipulated using optical tweezers. To what extent can the laws of thermodynamics be scaled down to apply to individual microscopic systems, and what new features emerge at the nanoscale? I will describe some of the challenges and recent progress – both theoretical and experimental – associated with addressing these questions. Along the way, my talk will touch on non-equilibrium fluctuations, “violations” of the second law, the thermodynamic arrow of time, nanoscale feedback control, strong system-environment coupling, and quantum thermodynamics.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

Thursday February 25th 2021 at 2pm via Zoom

The search for topological phases of matter

Dr. Ashley Cook 

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids

In our daily lives, we encounter phases of matter distinguished by the symmetries they break, such as steam and ice. Such phases are well-understood within the framework of Landau-Ginzburg theory developed decades ago, suggesting the work to characterize and understand phases of matter might be close to completion. In the 1980's, however, physicists were confronted with the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, phases of matter that cannot be distinguished by symmetry-breaking and therefore not understood using Landau-Ginzburg theory. Instead, these phases are distinguished by topology: they display signatures that are unaffected by sufficiently small perturbations (topological signatures), that we can measure with remarkable accuracy and associate with topological invariants. In the intervening decades, the set of topological phases of matter has expanded dramatically, with tremendous potential for applications from table-top study of high-energy physics to topologically-protected quantum computation. Considerable work remains, however, not just to understand the topological phases we have already found, but in simply finding the rest! In this talk, I will discuss some recently-discovered topological phases of matter, the topological skyrmion phases, to introduce this wide-ranging and increasingly important field of research and make clear that the search is far from over.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

Thursday November 26th 2020 at 2pm via Zoom

Magnetism of correlated systems: DFT+DMFT

Prof. Alexander Lichtenstein 

University of Hamburg

Effects of electron correlations in real magnetic materials will be discussed. Modern density functional theory (DFT) describe in principle only ground state properties but not magnetic excitations and spectral function of strongly correlated materials [1]. We used realistic dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) which allowed to study finite temperature correlations effects in different magnetic systems. Local charge and spin excitations calculated exactly using continuous-time Quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver [2]. Prospects of accurate description of non-local magnetic fluctuations will be addressed [3].

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Seminar

Thursday November 5th 2020 at 2pm via Zoom

Many-Body Localization in 2D: numerical results for dimer models

Dr. Francesca Pietracaprina 

MSCA Fellow, Trinity College Dublin

Many-body localization (MBL) is a way to break ergodicity, thermalization and transport in disordered interacting quantum systems.The existence of a many-body localization transition in 2D systems is an open question that is being addressed experimentally, theoretically and numerically. In this talk, I will show some recent numerical results for a model whose features make it especially accessible to exact diagonalization. We numerically study the possibility of many-body localization transition in a disordered quantum dimer model on the honeycomb lattice. By using the peculiar constraints of this model and state-of-the-art exact diagonalization and time evolution methods, we probe both eigenstates and dynamical properties, in large two-dimensional systems of up to N=108 sites.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Colloquium

Thursday October 22nd 2020 at 2pm via Zoom

Multi-messenger astronomy including gravitational-wave

Prof. Marica Branchesi 

Gran Sasso Science Institute and INFN

Branchesi
A new exploration of the Universe has recently started through gravitational-wave observations. On August 17, 2017, the first observation of gravitational waves from the inspiral and merger of a binary neutron-star system by the Advanced LIGO and Virgo network, followed 1.7 s later by a weak short gamma-ray burst detected by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites initiated the most extensive world-wide observing campaign which led to the detection of multi-wavelength electromagnetic counterparts. Multi-messenger discoveries are revealing the enigmas of the most energetic transients in the sky, probing neutron-stars physics, relativistic astrophysics, nuclear physics, nucleosynthesis, and cosmology. The talk will give an overview of the astrophysical implications of the gravitational-wave and multi-messenger observations, the prospects and challenges of the current and future gravitational-wave detectors.

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm / Zoom

 

Thursday 5th March 2020 at 2pm in SCN 128

Fast Radio Bursts

Dr Evan Keane 

Jodrell Bank Obervatory, UK

Bio / profile

Abstract: Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a booming industry. In this talk I will review the winding obstacle-strewn road of discoveries and adventures that FRB science has taken since the first discovery in 2007. Many mistakes, as well as key insights and discoveries have been made on this journey. At present, many astrophysical and cosmological applications of FRBs have been identified, significant progress is being made into identifying what their progenitors are and are not, and discovery rates continue to accelerate. I will close by looking at the potential to use FRBs as high precision tools for cosmological investigations, complementary to the standard techniques.

keane

Organiser/contact: Prof Lorraine Hanlon

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 27th February 2020 at 2pm in SCN 128

Particle acceleration at non-relativistic astrophysical shocks - limits and laboratories

Dr Brian Reville

Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, Germany

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: The standard picture for production of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) in supernova remnants (SNRs), while still the favoured model, is severely constrained by existing high energy gamma-ray observations. It is now clear that understanding the complex interplay between accelerated particles and the self-generated magnetic fields produced via cosmic-ray driven plasma instabilities is key to explaining Galactic CR origins. The current theory seems compatible with present observations of supernova remnants, but unfortunately is restricted by the rather limited data-set of existing young nearby examples, thus failing to provide the evidence necessary for a complete theory. A fascinating alternative and complementary laboratory to SNRs is the colliding-wind binary system Eta Carinae. I will argue that, not only do we require application of many of the non-linear predictions of self-generated magnetic fields to account for current observations, but that multi-wavelength observations in the high energy regime can provide a powerful diagnostic on the processes relevant to particle acceleration at shocks in a novel time-dependent laboratory, and may thus help provide the final experimental piece of the puzzle in understanding CR origins.

Organiser/contact: Prof Peter Duffy

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 20th February 2020 at 2pm in SCN 128

Observe, learn, design: machine learning in physics and materials science

Prof. Stefano Sanvito

Theoretical Physics, Trinity College Dublin

Bio / Profile

plasma
ABSTRACT: The standard paradigm for discovery in physics and materials science is based on an interplay between laboratory experiments and the formulation of theories, which, depending on their type and complexity, can be solved by pen and paper or through computational studies. Recently much attention has been dedicated to a third way, namely to the use of machine-learning and artificial-intelligence methods to learn from existing data our physical and material world. In this talk I will provide a tutorial overview of such new paradigm and present examples of different complexities. First, I will show how one can use machine learning to predict a complex thermodynamical quantity, such as the Curie temperature of ferromagnets. In particular I will discuss how to develop meaningful feature attributes for magnetism and how these can be informed by experimental results only. The model presented allows one to forecast the magnetism critical temperature of a material from the sole knowledge of simple chemical information. Some discussion on how experimental data can be retrieved, curated and utilized will be provided. Then, I will discuss how the atomic structure can be represented in a way, which is amenable to machine learning. This is a non-trivial problem, affecting the outcome of any model aiming at establishing structure-to-property relations. I will show examples in which a many-body, but short-range, representation of the atomic distribution enables us to construct ultra-accurate force fields, agnostic of the nature of the chemical bond. These will be used to describe entire phase diagrams and materials under extreme conditions. Furthermore, the same representation will be used to predict electronic quantities and to perform global materials optimization over a vast phase space. Finally, I will show how the competition between different artificial-intelligence algorithms can be exploited to generate new structures according to known laws of chemistry. This is the case of the so called generative models, largely used in image processing, but only scarcely exploited in materials science.

Organiser/contact: Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 13th February 2020 at 2pm in SCN 128

Academic Developers on Theories of Change Workshop

Prof. Torgny Roxå

Centre for Engineering Education, Lund University Faculty of Engineering

Bio / Profile

 

Seminar in association with the National Forum for the enhancement of teaching and learning in higher education

plasma
ABSTRACT: Today academic development interventions (pedagogical courses, quality work, consulting, program review, reward for excellence in teaching and others) come in many shapes and forms. This workshop explores various interventions from a systemic perspective and discusses which schools of changes they relate to. The argument is that the impact of academic development can increase if various interventions are aligned with each other through the deliberate use of a theory of change. During the workshop participants discuss their experiences of academic development activities and analyse these in relation theories of change. After the workshop participants have enriched their understanding of how clusters of academic development interventions can work together within a higher education organisation.
Torgny Roxå, Associate professor at Lund University, Faculty of Engineering has 30 years of experience in academic development with a focus on developing quality cultures in higher education organisations. He developed the first pedagogical academy, the Lund ETP, which now runs on its 18th year and inspired around 30 Swedish and international institutions. His research is focused upon the strategic change in teaching cultures within higher education organisations, especially significant networks and microcultures.

Organiser/contact: Prof Emma Sokell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 30th January 2020 at 2pm in SCN 128

Knowledge gaps in radiotherapy: research opportunities for physicists

Prof. Ben J.M. Heijmen

Radiation Oncology Physics, Cancer Institute, Erasmus University Medical Center
Rotterdam, the Netherlands

Bio / Profile

radiotherapy
ABSTRACT: It is generally appreciated that technology- and physics-driven research has been the driver for most major advancements in radiotherapy in the past decades. In the
opinion of the speaker, physics can in the coming decades continue to be a major player in radiotherapy innovation. To take part in it, physicists and institutions need
to make choices on topics they will work on. In this lecture, an overview will be given of research topics that could possibly result in clinical successes.

Organiser/contact: Prof. Luis Leon-Vintro

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 23rd January 2020 at 2pm in SCN 128

Metal-insulator transition and increase of superconducting fluctuations induced by apex oxygen displacement in high Tc copper oxides

Prof. Cedric Weber

Theoretical Physics, King's College London, UK

Bio / Profile

weber
ABSTRACT: 
Since its discovery in the mid 1980’s, the quest for unconventional superconductors with higher Tc, based on oxides of copper, have challenged and pushed the frontiers of our theoretical and experimental abilities. Finding a unified description or single tuning parameter that drives a superconductor towards higher critical temperatures continues to be a key but elusive ques- tion in this field. Within the paradigm of a newly developed high level ab-initio theory, which incorporates both local and the non-local correlations, we have shown that the Cu-apical Oxy- gen bond length can be used as a unique tuning parameter driving a copper oxide between a Mott insulator and a metal (metal-insulator transition) with a concomitant maximum in the superconducting Tc. We also observe that Tc continues to increase while spin fluctuations are maximum at a checkerboard ordering vector and start droping significantly as the fluctuation shifts to stripe ordering. These spin and charge susceptibilities and their evolution with tuning of Cu-apical-O bond length provide a deeper understanding of how to optimize Tc.

With this newly achieved theoretical ability, we have been able to connect the dots linking spectral properties to the superconducting Tc in cuprates and we believe it has the ability to push this field towards new frontiers in experimental and theoretical understanding of enhancement of Tc in unconventional superconductors. We will discuss the general implementation of GW interfaced with dynamical mean field theory, a methodology which opens new avenues for modelling complex correlated materials. 
 
References:
 
[1] Physical Review X 8, 021038 (2018)
[2] Europhysics Letters 100, 37001 (2012)
[3] Nature Physics 6, 574 (2010) 

Organiser/contact: Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Tuesday 14th January 2020 at 2pm in SCN 231

Controlling light down to the single-photon level with on-chip nanostructured devices

Prof. Luca Sapienza

Solid-State Quantum Optics group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, UK

Bio / Profile

plasma
ABSTRACT: Light-matter interactions allow exploring new physics and adding functionalities to photonic on-chip devices, thus enabling developments in classical (nano-lasers) and quantum (single-photon emitters) light sources, energy harvesters and sensors. These advances have been facilitated by unprecedented control in growth and fabrication techniques that have opened new pathways to the design and realization of semiconductor devices where light emission, trapping and guidance can be efficiently controlled. In this context, I will show the implementation of quantum dot nanostructures in nano-photonic cavities that can create simultaneously bright and pure, triggered single-photon sources, critical for quantum information applications. I will then present different photonic geometries for controlling light propagation, brightness and spontaneous emission rate, based on plasmonic nanostructures and photonic crystal waveguides. Finally, I will discuss novel designs based on bio-inspired aperiodic and disordered photonic crystals, showing efficient light confinement and optical sensing at visible wavelengths.

Organiser/contact: Prof Dominic Zerulla

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 231 at 2pm

Thursday 28th November 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Understanding the friction of atomically thin layered materials

Prof. Astrid de Vijn

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.

Bio / Profile

plasma
ABSTRACT: Friction is a ubiquitous phenomenon that greatly affects our everyday lives and is responsible for large amounts of energy loss in industrialised societies. Layered materials such as graphene have interesting frictional properties and are often used as (additives to) lubricants to reduce friction and protect against wear. Experimental Atomic Force Microscopy studies and detailed simulations have shown a number of intriguing effects such as friction strengthening and dependence of friction on the number of layers covering a surface. Here, we propose a simple, fundamental, model for friction on thin sheets. We use our model to explain a variety of seemingly contradictory experimental as well as numerical results. This model can serve as a basis for understanding friction on thin sheets, and opens up new possibilities for ultimately controlling their friction and wear protection.

Organiser/contact: Prof Pietro Ballone

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 21st November 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics of small quantum systems

Dr. Gabriele De Chiara

School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, UK

Bio / Profile

chiara
ABSTRACT:
The study of out-of-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics has received a significant thrust thanks to the experimental advances in the control and manipulation of microscopic systems. Work, heat and entropy, ubiquitous concepts in traditional thermodynamics, assume in this context the role of stochastic variables. Their fluctuations can be ingeniously related, through fluctuation theorems, to equilibrium properties, as is the case of the celebrated Jarzynski equality. In this talk, I will revise these concepts and discuss experimental schemes and realisations to directly measure work, heat and entropy in quantum systems. In the second part of the seminar I will present designs of small quantum thermal machines using a few spins or harmonic oscillators. This is the ideal context to investigate the effects of quantum correlations, for example entanglement and discord, on the performance of such quantum engines.

Organiser/contact: Dr Steve Campbell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 14th November 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Probing Electrochemical Processes by Time Resolved Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

Dr. Liam Collins

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Labs, USA

Bio / Profile

plasma
ABSTRACT: Like all aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology, electrochemical processes often emerge on the level of individual atomic scale defects, nanoscale defect assemblies and functional interfaces. Information on electrochemical processes at length scales encompassing the electric double layer, grain boundaries, and electrode interfaces will be necessary for continued advances in classical and flow batteries, supercapacitors, sensors, emerging biotechnologies amongst a myriad of emerging technologies. In ambient or UHV environments application of voltages during AFM measurements offers the opportunity to characterize nanoscale electronic, electromechanical, electrostatic, and electrochemical functionalities. Although challenging, voltage modulated measurements in liquids environments presents many exciting opportunities for nanoscale electrochemical measurements. [1] In my talk I will give an overview of AFM methods, I will describe static force based methods for probing electric double layer structures and lateral ordering in ionic liquids,[2] application of video rate AFM for monitoring crystal growth in-situ,[3] as well as opportunities for mapping electrochemical potentials[4] and charge dynamics using time resolved methods[4-5] developed in partnership between ORNL and UCD.[6]
[1] Collins, L., et al. Reports on Progress in Physics 81.8 (2018): 086101.
[2] Tsai, Wan-Yu, et al. Nano Energy 60 (2019): 886-893.
[3] Julianne Weber et al., (in preparation)
[4] Collins, Liam, et al. App. Phys. Lett. 104.13 (2014): 133103.
[5] Collins, L., et al. Nat. Comm. 5 (2014): 3871.
[6] Electrochemical Force Microscopy, US Patent 9,541,576, 2017

Organiser/contact: Prof Brian Rodriguez

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 17th October 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Insights on planetary systems from interstellar object 1I/`Oumuamua

Dr. Michele Bannister

School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, UK

Bio / Profile

Bannister
ABSTRACT: The small bodies of planetary systems record how their systems formed and evolved. Major observational surveys are providing new insight into the intricate dynamical structure of the populations of the outer Solar System. Together with colour measurements of their surfaces, it is finally possible to start piecing together the original compositional structure of our protoplanetary disk. Observations of the first interstellar object 1I/`Oumuamua show this visiting planetesimal has many curious properties, with kinship to the tiny worlds in our own system. Its 10^26 cousins wandering the Galaxy are part of an overarching cycle of planetesimal formation and scattering over billions of years. I will outline how this vast population of interstellar objects could be crucial to the observed fast formation of planets.

Organiser/contact: Prof Lorraine Hanlon

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 10th October 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Topology of Domain Walls in Ferroelectric Materials

Dr. Salia Cherifi-Hertel

Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, France

Bio / Profile

salia
ABSTRACT: The properties of domain walls in ferroelectric systems can significantly differ from those of the adjacent domains. Such local changes of the material properties could result from a speculiar organization of the polarization at the core of the walls. Recent theoretical studies have shown that even in the simplest case of nominally uncharged 180° ferroelectric walls, which were originally assumed to display Ising-type configuration, a Néel or Bloch-type internal structure can exist. The possibility of ferroelectric systems to develop such non-Ising domain walls is now well-established, but their experimental observation is challenged by the difficulty to detect the polarization configuration in an extremely narrow region, since the domain wall width typically extends only over a few atomic cells. We use local second-harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry, and numerical simulations exploiting symmetry considerations, to probe ferroelectric domain walls in thin epitaxial films as well as in three-dimensional (3D) bulk crystals. In this talk, I will first demonstrate the existence of polarization component within the 180° wall regions separating c-domains in uniaxial ferroelectric systems [1]. Deviations from the ideal Ising configuration, and a Néel-type internal structure are evidenced in tetragonal Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 thin films. As an independent test of our approach, we investigate a periodically poled trigonal LiTaO 3 bulk crystal in which theoretical studies predict Bloch-type walls. In spite of significant differences between the two systems (i.e., film vs. bulk, 3m vs. 4mm symmetry), a deviation from the Ising configuration is also observed in Y-oriented walls, with predominant Bloch-type configuration. This corroborates recent theoretical predictions of a more complex, often chiral domain wall structure.

[1] S. Cherifi-Hertel et al., Nat. Commun. 8, 15768 (2017).

Organiser/contact: Prof Brian Rodriguez

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 7th November 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Navigating Apollo 11 to the Moon

Dr. Pat Norris

Formerly of NASA

Bio / Profile

apollo 11
ABSTRACT: 

The talk will outline the navigation challenges faced by the Apollo 11 Moon landing mission in July 1969.  Space navigation requires knowledge of the forces acting on the spacecraft and tracking data that measures its coordinates.  The several techniques for tracking a space vehicle will be outlined and the specific techniques used for the Apollo missions explained.  The most critical forces were the gravitational fields of the Moon, Earth and Sun, plus the thrusts exerted by the spacecraft’s own rocket motors, and these will be reviewed.  The navigation results of the various mission phases will then be described.  Examples from the speaker’s own Apollo experience will be included.

Organiser/contact: Prof Lorraine Hanlon

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Tuesday 17th September 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Quasielastic Neutron Scattering for the investigation of the nanoscale dynamics in soft condensed
matter

Dr Antonio Faraone

Neutron Research Centre of the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Maryland, USA

Bio / Profile

farone
ABSTRACT: Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is a scattering technique for the investigation of relaxational dynamics with nanoscale space and time resolution. I will introduce the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) as a user facility with emphasis on its capabilities for QENS measurements on soft condensed matter using the disk chopper time-of-flight, backscattering, and neutron spin echo spectrometers. In the second part of my talk, I will review few selected scientific projects, on polymer nanocomposites, molecular liquids, and phospholipid bilayer, in which the use of QENS technique has played a focal role. These examples provide an overview, necessarily partial, of the research efforts, currently being carried out at NCNR, on the dynamics of soft condensed matter systems.

Organiser/contact: Dr Antonio Benedetto

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North

Wednesday 12th June 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Modelling the crystalline lens in the human eye

Dr. Alexander Goncharov

NUI Galway 

 

ABSTRACT: TBA

Organiser/contact: Prof Brian Vohnsen 

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 13th June 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Title TBA

Prof. Douglas MacFarlane

School of Chemistry, Monash University, Australia 

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: TBA

Organiser/contact: Dr Antonio Benedetto

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Friday 3rd May 2019 at 12 noon in SCN 128

BurstCube and Beyond: Using Scintillators and SiPMs to Detect Gamma-ray Bursts

Dr. Jeremy Perkins

Research Astrophysicist, NASA Goddard

Bio / profile

burstcueb
ABSTRACT: The first simultaneous detection of a short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) with a gravitational-wave (GW) signal provided direct proof that binary neutron star mergers are a progenitor of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) and propelled astronomy into the multi-messenger era. In order to further study the connection between gravitational waves and sGRBs, and thus enable multi-messenger science, we must increase the number of sGRB-GW simultaneous detections. To accomplish this we require full sky coverage in the gamma-ray regime. BurstCube aims to expand sky coverage in order to detect and localize gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). BurstCube is comprised of 4 Cesium Iodide scintillators coupled to arrays of Silicon photo-multipliers on a 6U bus and is sensitive to gamma-rays between 50 keV and 1MeV, the ideal energy range for GRB prompt emission. BurstCube will complement current observatories, such as Swift and Fermi, in the detection of GRBs as well as provide astronomical context to gravitational wave events detected by LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA. BurstCube is currently in its development phase with an expected launch date of ~2022. The BurstCube instrumentation is also being included in proposed missions such as Bia (a small sat with significantly better sensitivity than Fermi-GBM) and Nimble (a mission to discover and study kilonova); both of which would fly in the late 2020's if approved.

Organiser/contact: Prof Sheila McBreen

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 12 noon

Thursday 2nd May 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Magnetic moments in superconductors

Prof. Jens Paaske

Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Bio / profile

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ABSTRACT: Since their discovery in 1911, superconductors have played a prominent role in physics labs throughout the world. In recent years, they have taken on a new role, as the host for an even more exotic state of matter,referred to as a topological superconductor. These systems form at the interface between conventional superconductors like Al or Pb and semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling and/or suitable magnetic materials, and since they hold the promise of topologically protected quantum bits, they are currently at the center of attention in many condensed matter physics labs. Apart from their potential for quantum computing, topological superconductors have instigated renewed interest in the intricate interplay between superconductivity and magnetic degrees of freedom. This question dates back to the 1950’ies, but the recent advances in material growth and custom made hybrid materials provide an exciting new perspective on this venerable problem. In this colloquium, I will outline the physics of single magnetic moments, spin chains and spin lattices embedded in superconductors, and the fascinating magnetic and superconducting phases, which arise through competing or supporting ordering.

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 18th April 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

HELIOS: a time resolved pump probe source for the study of magnetic dynamics and tr-ARPES

Dr. Robert Stefanuik

 

Bio / profile

helios
ABSTRACT: The high energy laser induced overtone source (Helios) is a time resolved pump-probe source whichutilizes high harmonic generation (HHG) to produce laser pulses in the 20 eV – 72 eV range with a temporal cross correlation of the order of 50 fs. The source features two end stations, the first being a reflectometry based spectrometer optimized for studying element specific ultrafast demagnetization dynamics in magnetic alloys. The other end station features a Sienta angular resolved time of flight spectrometer (ARTOF 2) which allows time-resolved ARPES measurements on solid and diffuse samples. In this talk the source capabilities and operation will be outlined and initial results from both end stations will be discussed.

Organiser/contact: Prof. Emma Sokell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 4th April 2019 at 2pm in SCN 231

Why it is so hard to detect Luttinger liquids in ARPES?

Dr. Piotr Chudzinski

Queen's University Belfast, UK

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: In this seminar, I discuss the problem of photoemission from a quasi-1D material. We identify two issues that play a key role in the detection of gapless Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) phase. Firstly, we show how a disorder -- backward scattering as well as forward scattering component, is able to significantly obscure the TLL states, hence the initial state of ARPES. Secondly, we investigate the photo-electron propagation towards a sample's surface. We focus on the scattering path operator contribution to the final state of ARPES. We show that, in the particular conditions set by the 1D states, one can derive exact analytic solution for this intermediate stage of ARPES. The solution shows that for particular energies of incoming photons the intensity of photo-current may be substantially reduced. In the final part of the talk, I will put together the two aspects (the disorder and the scattering path operator) to show the full, disruptive force of any inhomogeneities on the ARPES amplitude. If time permits, I will show how the formalism developed above can be generalised and used also in a surprisingly different, low energy context e.g. transport properties through 1D dislocations.

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 231 at 2pm

Thursday 28th March 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

The ever-changing Universe: Exploding stars and catastrophic collisions

Dr Kate Maguire

Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, UK 

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: Supernovae are the incredibly luminous deaths of stars that play vital roles in chemical enrichment, galaxy feedback mechanisms, and stellar evolution. In particular, Type Ia supernovae, the explosions of white dwarf stars in binary systems, were instrumental in the discovery of dark energy. However, what are their progenitor systems, and how they explode, remains a mystery. There is increasing observational evidence that there are multiple ways in which white dwarfs can explode. I will review the status of what we know about the stellar systems that produce Type Ia supernovae, as well as discuss the recently discovered zoo of peculiar transients that are also predicted to result from the explosions of white dwarfs, such as He-shell mergers, tidal disruption events, and violent mergers. Distinguishing between these explosion scenarios and understanding their diversity is vital for producing the best samples for future precision measurements of the cosmological parameters. Finally, I will highlight the link to the exciting new area of transient research in the identifying and studying of the electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves sources and future complementary discovery and follow-up transient surveys.

Organiser/contact: Dr Morgan Fraser

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 21st March 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) and Fast Radio Bursts

Dr. Jojo Boyle

CHIME/FRB Project Manager, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: 
The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a new and novel radio telescope consisting of four 20m X 100m cylindrical reflectors and is located at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in British Columbia. CHIME was originally designed to map neutral hydrogen as a function of redshift to probe the expansion history of the Universe.  However, with a field of view of 250 square degrees and a wide operating bandwidth of 400-800 MHz, CHIME is also an excellent instrument to search for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs).  I will present an overview of CHIME and its FRB search engine together with early science results that includes the first detection of FRBs at frequencies as low as 400 MHz and the discovery of a second-ever repeating FRB.

Organiser/contact: Prof. John Quinn

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Tuesday 26th February 2019 at 3pm in SCN 128

Engaging Students in Authentic Scientific Practices in Physics Lab Courses

Prof Heather Lewandowski

Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: Physics is an empirical science. Therefore, learning physics must include learning how to design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data, and revise models and apparatus. Physics lab courses at the introductory and upper-division levels are one of only a few opportunities for students to engage in these authentic physics practices. For many students, instructional labs are the only opportunity. However, these courses do not always have the students reach the desired learning goals. Our work looks to improve lab experiences by improving students’ competency with modeling of physical and measurement systems, troubleshooting skills, documentation practices, and views of the nature of experimental physics.

Organiser/contact: Dr Tom McCormack
Seminar co-hosted with the School of Education

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 3pm

Wednesday 20th February 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

Ice crystallization observed in highly supercooled confined water

Prof. Fabio Bruni

Department of Sciences, Roma Tre University of Rome, Rome, Italy 

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: We investigate the state of water confined in the cylindrical pores of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica, with pore diameters of 2.8 nm and 4.5 nm, over the temperature range 160 - 290 K by combining small angle neutron scattering and wide angle diffraction. This allows us to observe simultaneously the intermolecular correlations in the local water structure (which shows up in a main water peak around Q=1.7 1/Å), the two-dimensional hexagonal arrangement of water cylinders in the silica matrix (which gives rise to a pronounced Bragg peak around Q=0.2 1/Å), and the so-called Porod scattering at smaller Q (which arises from larger scale interfacial scattering within the material). In the literature, the temperature evolution of the intensity of the Bragg peak has been interpreted as the signature of a density minimum in confined water at approximately 210 K. Here we show that, under the conditions of our experiment, a fraction of freezable water coexists with a layer of non-freezable water within the pore volume. The overall temperature dependence of our data in the different Q regions, as well as the comparison of the data for the two pore sizes, leads us to conclude that the observed variation in the intensity of the Bragg diffraction peak is actually caused by a liquid to ice transition in the freezable fraction of confined water.
 
For more information, see the recent PCCP paper

Organiser/contact: Dr Antonio Benedetto

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 31st January 2019 at 2pm in SCN 128

The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey

Dr. Tim Shimwell

Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON) 

Bio / profile

ABSTRACT: The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) is an ongoing sensitive, high-resolution 120-168MHz survey of the entire northern sky for which observations are now 35% complete and a further 15% are scheduled over the coming year. LoTSS has a source density approximately 10 times higher than the most sensitive existing very wide-area radio-continuum surveys and we have already catalogued 2,000,000 radio sources making it the largest survey to date. In this talk I I describe the current status of the survey and outline what can be expected from LoTSS in the near future. I also describe other projects that are being conducted by the LOFAR surveys team including deep 120-168MHz integrations on famous extragalactic fields, a 0.3arcsec resolution survey, and the LOFAR Low Band Antenna survey (40-70MHz). Finally, to demonstrate the scientific potential of the survey I will briefly overview some of recent results from the survey team.

Organiser/contact: Prof. John Quinn

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Wednesday 16th January 2019 at 10am in SCN 128

PhD Defence Talk -- Public Presentation

Rusul Al-Shammari

Ferroelectric lithium niobate-metallic nanoparticle template s for plasmonic-assisted biosensing applications

 

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 10am

 

 

Tuesday 15th January 2019 at 3pm in SCN 128

Lighting up the world of metabolomics

Prof Roy Goodacre

Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, UK

Bio / profile

Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical technique for the characterisation of chemical species. However, whilst this inelastic light scattering approach offers unique molecular specificity the signal is usually rather weak. Fortunately this signal can be significantly enhanced using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SERS involves coupling the analyte(s) with a metal surface during the Raman acquisition. Using judicious design of experiments we have recently demonstrated excellent detection and quantification for a range of drugs and biomarkers using SERS. In this presentation we shall demonstrate this for the absolute quantification of drugs and metabolites directly in human body fluids. When the sample matrix is complex then prior separation is needed and so we shall also highlight our work in coupling liquid chromatography to Raman. Finally, as Raman has a spatial resolution of ca. 1 um it can be used for imaging of biological systems and this will be demonstrated for drug detection in eukaryotic cells as well as metabolic labeling of bacteria with stable isotopes as a step towards understanding microbial communities.

Organiser/contact: Prof. Brian Rodriguez

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 3pm

Wednesday 28th November 2019 at 9am in SCN 232

PhD Defence Talk -- Public Presentation

Francis McQuillan

Plasma simulations for extreme ultraviolet source development

 

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 232 at 9am

 

 

Thursday 22nd November 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

Correlations and coherence in work extraction and dissipation

Prof. John Goold

School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin 

Bio / profile

goold

Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 1st November 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

Enhanced and degraded topological order through localisation

Dr. Graham Kells

Dublin Institute for Advanced Study (DIAS), School of Theoretical Physics

Bio / profile

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Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Friday 26th October at 12 noon in SCN 232

PhD Defence Talk -- Public Presentation

Oisin Maguire

"Understanding the dynamics of colliding plasmas with potential for EUV/SXR source development"

 

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 232 at 10am

 

 

Friday 26th October at 10am in SCN 129

PhD Defence Talk -- Public Presentation

Stephan O’Brien

Studying VHE Blazars with VERITAS and the detection of VHE emission from OJ 287

 

Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 129 at 10am

 

 

Thursday 18th October 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

Electrophoresis of gas bubbles

Associate Prof. Vladimir Lobaskin

School of Physics, University College Dublin

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Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Dr Vladimir Lobaskin

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Tuesday 16th October 2018 at 3pm in SCE E0.01 

Non-equilibrium coupling of protein structure and function to protein synthesis

Prof. Edward P. O'Brien

PSU Institute for CyberScience & Dept. of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Bio

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Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Dr Vio Buchete

Venue: Room E0.01 (O'Brien Centre for Science East) at 3pm

Thursday 11th October at 3pm in SCN 128

PhD Transfer Talk:

Elgiva White 

High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Laser Produced Plasma and High Harmonic Sources

 

Organiser/contact: Prof Ronan McNulty

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 3pm

 

 

Tuesday 9th October 2018 at 1:30pm in SCN 232

Photoinduced Force Microscopy: a technique for hyperspectral nanochemical mapping

Dr. Ian Holton

Acutance Scientific Ltd, UK

Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Dr James Rice

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 232 at 1:30pm

Thursday 4th October 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

A low-frequency radio perspective on AGN

Dr. Leah Morabito

University of Oxford, Department of Physics 

Bio / profile

Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Prof. John Quinn

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Thursday 13th September 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

Scientific Highlights of the NASA Fermi High Energy Astrophysics Satellite

Dr. Julie McEnery

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Maryland 

Bio / profile

fermigam

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Organiser/contact: Prof. Lorraine Hanlon

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Wednesday 29th August 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

Understanding how ligands migrate to the buried 
active site of the malaria M1 aminopeptidase

Dr Irina Tikhonova

School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, UK

Bio / profile

tikhonova_fig

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Organiser/contact: Prof Vio Buchete

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Monday 27th August 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

Disorder Modulates the Activity in the CCCH-type  Zinc Finger Proteins

Prof Francesca Massi

University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, USA

Bio / profile

massi

Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Prof Vio Buchete

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Tuesday 3rd July 2018 at 2pm in SCN 128

The practicalities of transitioning to active learning and an example of what it looks like

Theo Hughes 

School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.  

Bio / profile

hughes

Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Dr Deirdre Coffey

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 2pm

Friday 11th May 2018 at 12 noon in SCN 128

Particle manipulation using near-field optics

Prof. Sile Nic Chormaic

OIST, Okinawa, Japan 

Bio / profile

Optical nanofibre based cavity

Abstract (click here to show/hide)

Organiser/contact: Prof. Brian Vohnsen

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 12 noon

Thursday 26th April 2018 at 3pm in SCN 128

Ephemeral Domain Wall-based Transistors: How do we get there?                                                                                         

Dr Amit Kumar

School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast 

Bio / profile

amit kumar

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Organiser/contact: Prof Brian Rodriguez

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 3pm

Monday 9th April 2018 at 3pm in SCN 231

Manipulating charge, spin and valley currents in 2D materials      

Dr Stephen Power

Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain 

Bio / profile

spower

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Organiser/contact: Dr Andrew Mitchell

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 231 at 3pm

Thursday 5th April 2018 at 3pm in SCN 128

Watching Ions Move: Scanning Probe Microscopy on Perovskite Solar Cells                                                                                  

Prof Stefan Weber

Physics of Interfaces,
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research,
Mainz, Germany 

Bio / profile

kumar2

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Organiser/contact: Dr Brian Rodriguez

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 3pm

Thursday 29th March 2018 at 3pm in SCN 128

Going fast:  Biomechanical lessons from jumping insects

Dr Gregory Sutton

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

Bio / profile

mantis

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Organiser/contact: Dr Morgan Fraser

UCD School of Physics, Belfield Campus, Science Centre North, Seminar Room 128 at 3pm