Letter from William Wentworth Fitzwilliam to Henry Addington, 27 July 1817

The Fitzwilliam family were a very wealthy British family. William Wentworth Fitzwilliam, 2nd (4th) Earl Fitzwilliam, inherited the Wentworth estates in England and Ireland when his uncle, Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquis of Rockingham, died in 1782. He subsequently became one of the richest members of the nobility.

The papers of the Fitzwilliam Family held in UCD Archives consist of a collection of papers mainly arising from or associated with Fitzwilliam family finances, probably accumulated by an auctioneer or bookseller. The main Fitzwilliam Collection, under the title the Wentworth Woodhouse Collection, is housed in the Sheffield Archives

One of the more interesting items in the collection is a letter from William Wentworth Fitzwilliam, to Henry Addington, Viscount Sidmouth, dated 27 July 1817, reporting his impressions of the current situation in York following two linked armed risings in Huddersfield and Sheffield. These small risings took place on the night of 8-9 June 1817 and became known as the Folly Hall and Pentridge risings. Fitzwilliam seeks to reassure Viscount Sidmouth, stating “In no part of the Riding can I discover any symptom of conspiracy or revolutionary combinations”.

UCDA P3/17 Papers of the Fitzwilliam Family. Letter from William Wentworth Fitzwilliam to Henry Addington, 27 July 1817.

Letter from William Wentworth Fitzwilliam to Henry Addington, page 1

Letter from William Wentworth Fitzwilliam to Henry Addington, page 2

Letter from William Wentworth Fitzwilliam to Henry Addington, page 3

Wentworth 27th July 1817

Earl Fitzwilliam

Arr’d [sic] 3rd Aug’st

[sal?] to the State of his County.

Private

Wentworth 27th July 1817

 

My Lord

I have great satisfaction in reporting to your Lordship, that the result of my enquiries at York has proved as favorable as could be expected or wish’d [sic]. In no part of the Riding can I discover any symptom of conspiracy or revolutionary combinations going forward, even at Huddersfield and its neighbourhood, the spirit is subdued; the Parties, as I collect from Mr Allen, are cow’d [sic] and dispirited, and notwithstanding the issue of the Trials at York (of which your Lordship will undoubtedly receive the particulars from those better able than I am to detail them) left as They must now feel themselves without hope of support or cooperation. They will no doubt think it is a happy compromise to keep the peace, if they are left at rest themselves.

I have the honor to be my Lord

your Lordship’s most obed. [sic]

Wentworth Fitzwilliam

Viscount Sidmouth

 

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