ACADEMIC YEAR 2014-15

SEMESTER 2
TCD Seminar
22 January

The Greater War? Writing the History of World War II

Prof. Richard Overy (University of Exeter)

Professor Overy's research interests have include many aspects of the history of the Third Reich and the Second World War and, more recently, of Stalin's Soviet Union and the Soviet war effort. He is currently working on a book which explores the development of a morbid culture in inter-war and wartime Europe and examines the links between that culture and the nature of war, civil war and genocide. He is currently preparing a research project on bombing and its impact during the Second World War which will look comparatively at the experience of bombed communities in Britain, France, Italy, Germany and the Soviet Union. He is also continuing research on aspects of the German economy under Hitler.

Time: Thursday at 4:00 PM

Venue: TRIARC Seminar Room, TCD

TCD Seminar
3 February

Competing Victimhoods? How Poles and other Eastern Europeans commemorate their violent pasts

Dr Dariusz Stola (Institute of Political Science, Polish Academy of Sciences)

Dariusz Stola is a historian, professor at the Institute of Political Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, fellow at the Center of Migration Research, University of Warsaw. Since March 2014 he is the Director of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews. His main research interests include history of international relations, Polish-Jewish relations, and the communist regime in Poland. He has published more than one hundred articles and ten books, including: Kraj bez wyjscia? Migracje z Polski 1949-1989; Kampania antysyjonistyczna w Polsce 1967-1968 (2000); Nadzieja i zagłada (1995); PRL: trwanie i zmiana (2003, with M. Zaremba); Patterns of Migration in Central Europe (2001, with C. Wallace), PZPR jako machina władzy (2012, with K. Persakiem) and three text books for upper middle schools.

This paper is presented as part of the Europe's Violent Memories Lecture series.

Time: Tuesday at 6:00 PM

Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub

TCD Seminar
10 February

Friendly aliens, enemy aliens or just aliens? Britain and the Jews of Europe, 1939-1945

Prof. David Cesarani (Royal Holloway College, University of London)

David Cesarani is research professor in history at Royal Holloway, University of London. He advised the Home Office unit responsible for Holocaust memorial day and was a member of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office delegation to the Intergovernmental Taskforce for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research.

Prof. Cesarani has written several books dealing with the Nazi persecution and mass murder of the Jews, and its aftermath, including: Eichmann. His life and crimes (2004), which won the 2006 National Jewish Book Award for History in the USA and Justice Delayed. How Britain became a refuge for Nazi war criminals (1992) and edited seveal more, including  After Eichmann. Collective Memory and the Holocaust since 1961 (2005); with Paul Levine ‘Bystanders’ to the Holocaust. A re-evaluation (2002); Genocide and Rescue. The Holocaust in Hungary, 1944 (1998); The Final Solution. Origins and Implementation (1994). 

This paper will be presented as the Holocaust Memorial Lecture.

Time: Tuesday at 7:30 PM

Venue: TCD Burke Theatre

TCD Seminar
19 February

"Authentic violence" and imperial nationalism: Australian and Canadian war exhibitions, 1917-1922

Dr Jennifer Wellington (University College Dublin)

Dr Wellington is a lecturer in modern global history at UCD. Her research focuses on the cultural history of warfare in the first half of the twentieth century. After completing honours degrees in Law and English at the Australian National University, she pursued her doctorate in history at Yale University.

Her PhD thesis "War and the Imperial Imaginary: museums, exhibitions and visual displays of the First World War in Britain, Canada and Australia, 1914-42" was awarded the 2013 Hans Gatzke Prize for Outstanding Dissertation in a Field of European History.  She is currently preparing it for publication as a monograph.

Time: Thursday at 4:00 PM

Venue: TRIARC Seminar Room, TCD

TCD Seminar
3 March

The politics of forgetting and forgiving: Italian Fascism and the Second World War

Prof. Christopher Duggan (University of Reading)

Profesor Duggan has written and researched extensively on many aspects of modern Italian history.  His books include A History of Sicily, with M. I. Finley and D. Mack Smith (Chatto and Windus, 1986), Fascism and the Mafia (Yale University Press, 1989), A Concise History of Italy (Cambridge University Press, 1994), Francesco Crispi. From Nation to Nationalism (Oxford University Press, 2002) and The Force of Destiny. A History of Italy since 1796 (Allen Lane, 2007). All these books have been translated into Italian.

His most recent book, Fascist Voices. An Intimate History of Mussolini's Italy (Bodley Head, 2012) was named Political History Book of the Year at the Political Book Awards in February 2013.

This paper is presented as part of the Europe's Violent Memories Lecture series.

Time: Tuesday at 7:30 PM

Venue: Synge Theatre, TCD

TCD Seminar
5 March

Did Women have a Great War?

Prof. Susan Grayzel (University of Mississippi)

Susan R. Grayzel is Professor of History at the University of Mississippi and Director of the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies. Her publications include the books: Women’s Identities at War: Gender, Motherhood, and Politics in Britain and France during the First World War (1999); Women and the First World War (2002); The First World War: A Brief History with Documents (2012); and At Home and Under Fire: Air Raids and Culture in Britain from the Great War to the Blitz (2012). 

She is currently an ACLS Collaborative Research Fellow with Dr. Lucy Noakes, starting a new project on gender, citizenship and civil defense in twentieth-century Britain, and finishing a book on the cultural responses to chemical warfare and efforts to protect civilian bodies in Europe and its overseas colonies from The Hague Conventions through the Second World War, with an emphasis on imperial Britain.

This paper will be presented as the annual War in History Lecture.

Time: Thursday at 7:30 PM

Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub, Hoey Theatre

TCD Seminar
24 March

The Post-Soviet space: memories and experience of violence from Afghanistan to Ukraine

Dr. Jan C. Behrends (Centre for Contemporary History (ZZF), Potsdam)

Dr Behrends is Research fellow and coordinator of the Leibniz-project “Physical Violence in Late Socialism” at Centre for Contemporary History (ZZF), Potsdam. His research areas include Russian Studies, Soviet History, Literature, and Communism. He is the author of several publications; Underground Publishing and the Public Sphere. Transnational Perspectives (2014), edited and introduced with Thomas Lindenberger. Censorship and its counterpart, the 'underground' production and distribution of printed texts and images, existed ever since a 'public sphere' came into being. The volume approaches this phenomenon by covering cases from the Tsarist Empire, the Soviet Union, Central Europe, South America and China. In a long-term as well as global perspective, the well-known practise of samizdat under communist rule may be understood as part of a long tradition of underground publishing still relevant today in places like Russia, Iran, or China. And Races to Modernity. Metropolitan Aspirations in Eastern Europe, 1890-1940 (Budapest/ New York: Central European University Press 2014), edited and introduced with Martin Kohlrausch.

This paper is presented as part of the Europe's Violent Memories Lecture series.

Time: Tuesday at 6:00 PM

Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub, Hoey Theatre

UCD Seminar
24 March

Muslims in the Waffen-SS: The case of the Albanian "Skanderbeg" Division

Dr Franziska Zaugg (Gerda Henkel Foundation)

Dr Zaugg is a Gerda-Henkel-Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at UCD’s Centre for War Studies. She studied at the University of Bern and Fribourg (Switzerland) and is primarily interested in the history of World War II in Southeastern Europe and the commemoration of that conflict during and after the era of Tito and Enver Hoxha.

Time: Tuesday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room TBC

UCD Seminar
31 March

Nazi Propaganda in Franco's Spain

Dr Mercedes Peñalba (University College Dublin)

Dr Peñalba is an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow working on the effects of Nazi propaganda on Spain during World War II. She obtained her PhD from the University of Navarra. Her first monograph, Falange Española: historia de un fracaso (1933-1945), focused on the history of Franco’s party and was published by University of Navarra Press in 2009.

Boundaries of the narratable: the Holocaust and sexuality

Dr Anna Hájková (University of Warwick)

Dr Hájková is Assistant Professor of Modern Continental European History, University of Warwick and her research interests include the Holocaust, Nazi Germany, and modern Central and Eastern Europe, as well as on the history of genocides, history of gender and sexualities, and history of everyday life in general.

Time: Tuesday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

UCD Seminar
28 April

In pursuit of a political agenda - Serbian paramilitaries during the period of Greater war 1912-1923

Dr Dmitar Tasić (University College Dublin)

Dr Tasić is an IRC Postdoctoral Fellow at UCD’s Centre for War Studies. He received his PhD from the University of Belgrade and has worked for many years for the Serbian Military History Institute / Strategic Research Institute. He has been the editor of the Military History Review since 2013 and is currently President of the Serbian National Commission of Military History.

From Greater War to Lesser Peace: The Fury of the Chetniks, 1923-1944

Dr John Paul Newman (Maynooth)

Dr Newman is a Lecturer in Modern European History at the National University of Ireland at Maynooth. Until September 2011, he was an ERC Postdoctoral Research Fellow working on the project 'Paramilitary Violence after the Great War', to which he contributed a case study of violence in the Balkans.

Time: Tuesday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

SEMESTER 1
TCD Seminar
23 September

World War One: Structural causes or personal responsibilities?

Dr William Mulligan (UCD)

Dr William Mulligan teaches modern international history at UCD. His research focuses on the history of international politics in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. After completing his PhD at the University of Cambridge he taught at UCD and the University of Glasgow. Dr Mulligan was a Member at the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton in 2012, and in 2014, a EURIAS Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. He has written The creation of the modern German army (Berghahn, 2005) and The origins of the First World War (Cambridge, 2010) and The Great War for Peace (Yale, 2014).

This lecture is co-organised with the Dublin University History Society.

Time: Tuesday at 7:30 PM

Venue: Synge Theatre, TCD

UCD Seminar
2 October

Democracy without Leaders: The Collective Spirit of post-war West European Democracy, 1945-68

Dr Martin Conway (Oxford University)

Dr Martin Conway’s research and publications have been driven by a number of overlapping interests in European history from roughly the 1930s to the 1960s. One central element of that interest has been the history of Belgium, which has been much overlooked in the historiography of the twentieth century, but which provides a fascinating example of the interplay of factors of class, of ideology and of linguistic identity.

Interpreting Stalinist Leader Cults in Post-War Eastern Europe

Dr Balázs Apor (Trinity College Dublin)

Dr Apor's research priorities embrace the study of culture and cultural politics, the formulation and transmission of myths and ideologies, strategies of political legitimation, and the popular reception of political ideologies and political systems. His research activity involves inquiries into specific issues of the Sovietisation process in Eastern Europe after the Second World War.

Time: Thursday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

UCD Seminar
16 October

Scholars or subversives?: Indian law students in Dublin, 1913-16

Dr Conor Mulvagh (UCD)

Dr Mulvagh is a Lecturer in Irish History at UCD working on commemoration and the Irish revolutionary decade (1912-23). He is currently researching a history of UCD during the Irish Revolution. His PhD (UCD, 2012) investigated the work and collective behaviour of Irish Nationalist MPs at Westminster between 1900 and 1918 and was funded by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Reading revolution: British intelligence and the domestic threat of political violence

Dr Darragh J. Gannon (NUIM) 

Dr Gannon tutors in Irish and European history at UCD. He has previously lectured in modern British and Irish history at NUI Maynooth and has held the position of Postdoctoral Research Assistant for Dr Enda Delaney’s project ‘Ireland and modernity’, Professor R.F. Foster’s project ‘The making of a revolutionary generation, 1890-1923’ and Professor Seán McConville’s project ‘Irish political prisoners, 1920-2000’. He was awarded his doctorate by NUI Maynooth in 2012 for a thesis entitled ‘Irish republicanism in Great Britain, 1917-21’. He has published in the Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium and Eire-Ireland and is currently completing a monograph entitled Conflict, diaspora and empire: Irish nationalism in Great Britain, 1912-22.

Time: Thursday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

UCD Workshop
17 October

Emergent Nations: Australia and Ireland in the First World War

On 17 October 2014, The Keith Cameron Chair of Australian History at UCD presents A Symposium on Emergent Nations: Australia and Ireland in the First World War

Speakers will include:
Prof Keith Jeffery: “Ireland, Gallipoli and the commemoration of the Great War'”
Prof David Fitzpatrick: “Irish, Australians, and Irish Australians in the Great War: some statistics”
Prof Carl Bridge: “The failure of the idea to form a lasting imperial cabinet & federation, c. 1917-21”
Prof Jeff Kildea: “Shirkers and Sinn Feiners: the Australian Irish and the First World War”
Dr Conor Mulvagh: “Commemoration in stone: Ireland, the Celtic Fringe and Australia considered”
Dr Jennifer Wellington: "Displaying the nation: WW1 exhibitions in Britain & Australia, 1917-1925"

Click here to see the Conference Programme.

The conference will take place in Room K117, Newman Building, School of History & Archives.

For catering purposes please advise by 15 October if you will be attending the symposiumis jeff.kildea@ucd.ie.

UCD Seminar
30 October

Volk, Race and the Greater Germanic Reich: The Danish Case

Dr Steffen Werther (Sodertorn University, Sweden)

Dr Werther graduated in 2012 from a PhD program at the Center for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES) in cooperation with the University of Stockholm. His doctoral thesis examines the implementations of the SS's Greater Germanic idea in the Danish-German border region. Previously, he held research fellowships at the universities of Copenhagen, Kiel and Århus. He is primarily interested in 19th and 20th century German, Baltic and Scandinavian history, with a focus on nationalism, racial theory and Nazi ideology, and is a member of the research project "The Moral Economy of Global Civil Society: A History of Private Transnational Food Aid" (2013-2016; financed by the Swedish Research Council).

Hitler’s Brudervolk. Dutch volunteers for the Germanization of the Nazi East

Dr Geraldien Frijtag (NIOD Amsterdam) 

Dr von Frijtag received her Ph.D. in history from the University of Amsterdam in 1999. She has been a researcher at the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies in the Netherlands and currently holds the position of  Assistant Professor of History at the University of Utrecht. Her fields of interests encompass fascist and Nazi-ideology, German occupation policy, the Holocaust and ethnic cleansing in 20th century Europe.

Time: Thursday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

TCD Seminar
11 November

The ghosts of mid-century: violence, democracy and European memories since the Second World War

Prof. Peiter Lagrou (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Professor Pieter Lagrou is Professor of History at Université Libre de Bruxelles. Prior to that he was secretary general at International Committee for the History of the Second World War and Professeur externe at Sciences Po Paris.

This paper is being presented this as part of the Europe's Violent Memories Lecture series.

Time: Tuesday at 6:00 PM

Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub

UCD Seminar
13 November

A Southern Trench?: The Mobilization of Argentine Society during the Great War

Dr María Inés Tato (CONICET)

Dr Tato is the Coordinator of the Group of Historical War Studies at the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET). CONICET is the main organization in charge of the promotion of Science and Technology in Argentina.  The principal objective of this agency is to boost and implement scientific and technical activities in the country and in all different fields of knowledge. She is also faculty member at Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciencia Política.

The Portuguese-speaking world and the First World War

Prof. Filipe Ribeiro de Meneses (NUIM)

Prof. de Meneses joined NUI Maynooth in 1997 and published widely in aspects of contemporary Portuguese and Spanish history. In 2005 he was a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Instituto de Ciências Sociais, in the University of Lisbon, and in 2012 he was the FLAD/Brown Michael Teague Visiting Professor of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies at Brown University.

He is currently involved in a number of projects designed to mark the centenary of the First World War and on a longer-term study of the decolonization of Southern Africa. He was also the recipient of two major IRCHSS fellowships, the first in 2005 and the second in 2011.

Time: Thursday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

UCD Seminar
27 November

Towards a transnational history of European resistance

Prof. Robert Gildea (Oxford University)

Prof. Gildea's interests are in French and European history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has written on the impact of the German occupation in France and Europe during the Second World War and is currently working on French and European Resistance. He recently directed an international collaborative research project on 1968 in Europe based on the collection and analysis of oral testimony.

27 November

Towards a transnational history of European collaboration

Prof. Robert Gerwarth (University College Dublin)

Professor Robert Gerwarth is Professor of Modern History at UCD and Director of the Centre for War Studies. He is the author of The Bismarck Myth (Oxford UP, 2005), a biography of Reinhard Heydrich (Yale UP, 2011) and most recently, War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War (Oxford UP 2012, with John Horne) and Empires at War, 1911-23 (Oxford UP, 2014, with Erez Manela).

Time: Thursday at 4:30pm

Venue: UCD School of History & Archives, Newman Building, Room K115

TCD Seminar
2 December

Sexual violence during World War Two: processes of “unsilencing”

Dr Andrea Peto (Central European University, Budapest)

Dr Peto is Associate Professor at Central European University, Budapest. Her research areas include European Comparative social and gender history, gender and politics, women’s movements, qualitative methods, oral history, and the Holocaust. She received the Hungarian Republic with the Officer’s Cross Order of Merit of The Republic of Hungary (Magyar Koztarsasagi Erdemrend Tisztikeresztje) in 2005 and the Bolyai Prize of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 2006.

This paper is being presented as part of the Europe's Violent Memories Lecture series.

Time: Tuesday at 6:00 PM

Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub