Daniela holds a PhD in Criminology (2020) from the University of Edinburgh, MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh (2015). Her background is in legal and forensic psychology, assessing young people in need of protection for the Chilean Family Court, and working directly with young people who displayed sexually harmful behaviour for the Chilean Youth Justice System. Her working experience also involves teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level, including preparing social workers and psychologists to work with the Family Court in Chile or with young people in trouble in the Chilean Youth Justice System.

Her research interests focus on sociology of punishment, policy making, youth justice and children’s rights. Her research has been dedicated to explaining and understanding why and how societies create new institutions, evolve and change. Particularly, she focuses on the drivers behind crime control and security policy making, such as human rights, the needs of vulnerable citizens, poverty, discrimination, power distribution, democracy, populism, authoritarianism, political economy, accountability and the interaction between citizens and the state. She has a strong focus on social sciences, qualitative methods, and ethics, together with a keen interest in research.