Publications

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New Publication

 

Modernism as Memory: Building Identity in the Federal Republic of Germany

By Kathleen James-Chakraborty

Published by University of Minnesota Press, Jan 2018.

Re-examining architecture and memory in postwar Berlin: While others characterize contemporary Berlin’s museums and memorials as postmodern, Kathleen James-Chakraborty argues that they are examples of much older and more complex “architecture of modern memory.” She demonstrates that how one remembers can be detached from what one remembers, contrasting ruins with recollections of modernism to commemorate German suffering, the Holocaust, the industrial revolution, and new spaces for Islam.

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  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Modernism as Memory: Building Identity in the Federal Republic of Germany, University of Minnesota Press, Fall 2017.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Darmstadt in Context — Architecture and Design Reform c 1900', in “Eine Stadt müssen wir erbauen, eine ganze Stadt!,” Die Künsterkolonie Darmstadt auf der Mathildenhöhe, Wiesbaden: Landesamt für Denkmalpflege, 2017.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Is Modern Architecture Good?', in Peter Voggler & Stefan Graf (eds), Architecture in Asmara: Colonial Origin and Postcolonial Experience, Berlin: Dom, 2107.
  • Róisín Kennedy & Cormac O’Malley (eds), Nobody’s Business: Aran Diaries of Ernie O’Malley, 1941-1956, Lilliput Press, 2017.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Sir Hugh Lane (1875-1915), Harold Ainsworth Peto (1854-1933), James Miller (1860-1947) and the designs of the Cunard Liners RMS Lusitania and RMS Mauretania', in B. Dawson & J. O'Donnell (eds) Sir Hugh Lane 'That Great Pictured Song', Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, 2017.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Identity and Shifting Attitudes in Medieval Europe', in Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle, 2017.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Ireland and Europe: Transmission of Celtic Aesthetic in the Early Middle Ages', in Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle, 2017.
  • Lynda Mulvin, W. Hupperetz & M. Schmauder, 'Crossroads Travelling through the Middle Ages, AD 300-1000', in Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle, 2017.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Visual Culture and the Irish Revolution', ‘The Easter Lily’, ‘The Death of Cúchulainn in the GPO', in ed. John Crowley, Donal O’Drisceoil, Mike Murphy and John Borgonovo, Atlas of the Irish Revolution, Cork University Press, 2017.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Exiles and Immigration', Very Vary Veri, 5: 2017.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Schocken Department Store: ‘The Art of a Master'', in Twentieth-Century Architecture (Vol 4, The Companions to the History of Architecture), Wiley/Blackwell, 2017.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, 'Known unknowns: research on Irish museums seince 2008', Cultural TrendsVol. 26, Issue 3, 2017.
  • Carla Briggs, 'Out of the Shadows', Irish Arts Review, 34: 2, summer 2017.
  • Conor Lucey, 'Making Magnificence: architects, stuccatori and the eighteenth-century interior’, book review, Irish Arts Review, 34: 2, summer 2017.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Art, Nature and Modernity in the work of Jack B. Yeats and Paul Henry', in Jack B. Yeats and Paul Henry: Contrasting Visions of Ireland, Hunt Museum, Limerick (June, 2017).
  • Carla Briggs, 'Margaret Clarke (1884-1961) An Independent Spirit', in Margaret Clarke An Independent Spirit, National Gallery of Ireland, (May, 2017).
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, Co-Editor: Irish Journal of Arts Management & Cultural Policy, Volume 4 (April 2017).
  • John Loughman, 'Clara Peeters. Antwerp and Madrid', exhibition review, The Burlington Magazine, CLIX, No. 1368, March 2017.
  • John Loughman, Dutch Art and Urban Cultures 1200-1700 by E. de Bièvre, book review, The Burlington Magazine, CLIX, No. 1367, February 2017.
  • Conor Lucey, ‘William Salmon’, British bronze sculpture founders and plaster figure makers, 1800-1980, National Portrait Gallery, London, (Jan, 2017: read here).

 

 

Nobody’s Business: Aran Diaries of Ernie O’Malley, 1941-1956

Róisín Kennedy & Cormac O’Malley (eds),

Nobody’s Business: Aran Diaries of Ernie O’Malley, 1941-1956, (Lilliput Press, Oct, 2017)

This work offers new insights into the mind and opinions of one the key figures in post-independence cultural nationalism, revealing his views on art, literature, history, Irish life and international affairs in addition to his thoughts on the life of the Aran islanders


Crossroads. Reizen door de middeleeuwen / Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages

Associate Professor Mulvin is co-editor of and contributor to Crossroads. Reizen door de middeleeuwen / Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages (Allard Pierson Museum in collaboration with WBOOKS, Zwolle, 2017). 

Published in Dutch and English this book accompanies the CROSSROADS exhibition at the Allard Pierson Museum, Amsterdam (more information ...). The CROSSROADS exhibition is an initiative of the European CEMEC project for which Associate Professor Mulvin is the project leader in Ireland.


Irish Museums Survey

Funded by the Irish Research Council, the Irish Museums Survey 2016 is a research partnership between University College Dublin, the Irish Museums Association (IMA) and the Irish Museums Trust. Dr Emily Mark-FitzGerald (Principal Investigator, UCD) originated and led the research team.
It updates previous surveys of Museums in Ireland to reflect current structures, funding, and activities, and provides new information on recent and growing areas of interest, such as the impact of recession; alternative income and fundraising activities; the rise of digitization and online marketing; use of internships, volunteers and community employment schemes, etc. With 118 museums participating, the data presented in this report includes independent, community, county, regional and national museums, north and south, at all scales of activity. (Click here to download the Irish Museums Survey 2016, optimised for web viewing)


Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015

Book_Cover 

In October 1965 Dr Françoise Henry established Ireland’s first Department of art history at University College Dublin. This volume commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of that event. In the course of the last five decades the subject has evolved and this is manifest in the changing nature of the teaching and research interests of the staff in the Department that she founded. What is now the UCD School of Art History and Cultural Policy remains Ireland’s largest and most wide-ranging community of art historians. What better way to celebrate five decades of teaching and research, than to showcase this variety in a series of essays by fourteen permanent members of staff, past and present.

Published by Gandon Editions, November 2016. (ISBN 978-1-910140-12-3, €29, p&p free in Ireland)


Kathleen James-Chakraborty, India in Art in Ireland, Routledge, 2016.

India in Art in Ireland examines the relationship between these two ends of the British Empire played out in the visual arts. Examining a wide range of media, including manuscript illuminations, paintings, prints, architecture, stained glass, and photography, its authors demonstrate the complex nature of empire in India, compare these empires to British imperialism in Ireland, and explore the contemporary relationship between what are now two independent countries through a consideration of works of art in Irish collections, supplemented by a consideration of Irish architecture and of contemporary Irish visual culture.The collection features essays on Rajput and Mughal miniatures, on a portrait of an Indian woman by the Irish painter Thomas Hickey, on the gate lodge to the Dromana estate in County Waterford, and a consideration of the intellectual context of Harry Clarke's Eve of St. Agnes window. This book has its origins in a series of lectures funded by a UCD Seed Funding Grant awarded to Dr Nicola Figgis.


 Art and Architecture of Ireland

Art and Architecture of Ireland, a five-volume authoritative and fully illustrated account of the art and architecture of Ireland from the early Middle-Ages to the end of the 20th century, is one of the most ambitious projects ever undertaken in the Humanities in Ireland, the work of 10 editors and over 250 contributors [launch photographs].

The project was initiated by Dr Nicola Figgis and Professor Paula Murphy of the UCD School of Art History and Cultural Policy. Read the UCD Today feature.

Art and Architecture of Ireland is now free to download online in schools and libraries across Ireland through JSTOR.

 Volume II 

AAI_IIPaintingNicola Figgis is editor of and principal contributor to Art and Architecture of Ireland, Vol. II, Irish Painting 1600-1900 (Royal Irish Academy and Yale University Press, 2014, pp. 600, including 40 essays, 340 biographies, 500 illus.). Volume II of Art and Architecture of Ireland contains a broad range of material on the painters and painting of Ireland from 1600 to 1900, a critical period that saw the development of easel painting, patronage, formal art education, the exploration of antiquarianism and search for the pictorial expression of national identity. Thematic essays explore art education, exhibiting practices and the social history of Irish art, revealing how pictures were produced, acquired and traded in Ireland; differences between artistic life in Ireland, in London and on the Continent emerge from the biographies and essays.

The following graduates were involved in the painting volume: Nesta Butler, Maria Arnold, Marie Bourke, Myles Campbell, Fintan Cullen, Róisín Kennedy, Vera Murtagh and Éimear O’Connor.

Volume III 

AAI_IIISculpturePaula Murphy is editor of and principal contributor to Art and Architecture of Ireland, Vol. III, Sculpture 1600–2000 (Royal Irish Academy and Yale University Press, 2014, pp. 600, including 250 biographies; 45 essays; over 500 illustrations). Sculpture 1600–2000 establishes the narrative of Irish sculpture across four centuries, examines the practice of making sculpture and identifies the paucity of available literature on the subject before embarking on a series of biographies of individual sculptors in the form of a gazetteer and a range of thematic essays exploring different aspects of sculpture in Ireland from architectural sculpture to wood-carving. The text is richly illustrated, including two picture essays and a series of images of sculptors at work.

The following graduates were involved in the sculpture volume: Máire Byrne, Rita Larkin, Conor Lucey, Claire Lowney, Jacqueline Hayes, Jacquie Moore, Joe McDonnell, Kate Antosik-Parsons, Myles Campbell, Ruth Devine, Sean O’Reilly, Sheila Dickinson, Emily Mark-FitzGerald, Róisín Kennedy, Ruth Sheehy, Sighle Breathnach Lynch and William Gallagher.  ‌


Philip Cottrell & Wolfgang Marx (eds), Death, Burial, and the Afterlife. Dublin Death Studies, Carysfort Press, 2014.

The essays incorporated into this volume share an ambitious interest in investigating death as an individual, social and metaphorical phenomenon that may be exemplified by themes involving burial rituals, identity, and commemoration. The disciplines represented are as diverse as art history, classics, history, music, philosophy, languages and literatures, and the approaches taken reflect various aspects of contemporary death studies. The topics covered include: the exhumation and reburial of Cardinal John Henry Newman; the funerary monument of John Donne in his shroud; the funeral of Joseph Stalin; the theme of mutilation and non-burial of the corpse in Homer’s Iliad; the individual’s encounter with death in the work of the German Philosopher Josef Pieper; the Requiem by the Irish composer Charles Villiers Stanford; the imagery of death in Giovanni Verga’s novel Mastro-don Gesualdo, and the changing attitudes toward death in the writings of Michel Foucault. Further detail >>>

 


Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Architecture since 1400, University of Minnesota Press, January 2014

Architecture since 1400 is the first global history of architecture to give equal attention to Western and non-Western structures and built landscapes, Architecture since 1400 is unprecedented in its range, approach, and insight. From Tenochtitlan’s Great Pyramid in Mexico City and the Duomo in Florence to Levittown’s suburban tract housing and the Bird’s Nest Stadium in Beijing, its coverage includes the world’s most celebrated structures and spaces along with many examples of more humble vernacular buildings. Lavishly illustrated, this book presents key moments and innovations in architectural modernity around the globe. Making clear that visionary architecture has never been the exclusive domain of the West and recognizing the diversity of those responsible for commissioning, designing, and constructing buildings, Architecture since 1400 provides a sweeping, cross-cultural history of the built environment over six centuries.

Kathleen James-Chakraborty’s Architecture since 1400 deserves the widest possible readership. This is a brilliantly conceived and beautifully written book that presents an original analysis of notable buildings around the world.  (Dolores Hayden, Yale University)

Review: Journal of Architectural Education, 69:1, 2015


Emily Mark FitzGerald, Commemorating the Irish Famine: Memory and the Monument, Liverpool University Press, November 2013

Commemorating the Irish Famine: Memory and the Monument was launched on Thursday, 16th January 2014 in Newman House by Professor Peter Gray, Queen’s University, Belfast. This publication explores the visual cultural history of the 1840s Irish Famine, tracing its representation and commemoration from the 19th century up to the global Famine commemorative boom that accompanied the 150th anniversary in the 1990s and beyond, which resulted in close to one hundred monuments being newly constructed across Ireland, Britain, the United States, Canada and Australia. Drawing on an extensive global survey of recent community and national responses to the Famine’s anniversary, and by outlining why these memories matter and to whom, this book argues how the phenomenon of Famine commemoration may be understood in the context of a growing memorial culture worldwide.

The publication is accompanied by a new online resource -- www.irishfaminememorials.com. This online catalogue (a work in progress) showcases some of the research behind the book, presenting a sample of photographic records and information related to post-1990s Famine commemorative monuments in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Britain and the United States. The final resource will be a comprehensive guide to contemporary Famine commemoration and the full records pertaining to this research project will be integrated into University College Dublin’s Digital Library in 2014.

Fresh and perceptive ... a compelling and incisive study of famine monuments which offers valuable and timely insights into the practices and processes of memorialization. (Professor Margaret Kelleher, Professor of Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama, University College Dublin)

  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Modernism as Memory: Building Identity in the Federal Republic of Germany, University of Minnesota Press (Jan, 2018).
  • Róisín Kennedy & Cormac O’Malley (eds), Nobody’s Business: Aran Diaries of Ernie O’Malley, 1941-1956, Lilliput Press, 2017.
  • Lynda Mulvin & Maria Bormpoudaki, Marieke van den Doel, Wim Hupperetz, Faidra Kalafati, Lindsay Morehouse, Michael Schmauder (eds), Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle, 2017.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, Irish Museums Survey, Irish Museums Association, 2016.
  • Carla Briggs, Nicola Figgis, Lynda Mulvin & Paula Murphy (eds), Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD - 1965-2015, Gandon, 2016. 
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty (ed.), India in Art in Ireland, Routledge, 2016.
  • Nicola Figgis (ed.), Art and Architecture of Ireland Volume II: Painting 1600-1900, Yale University Press, 2014.
  • Paula Murphy (ed.), Art and Architecture of Ireland Volume III: Sculpture 1600-2000, Yale University Press, 2014.
  • Philip Cottrell & Wolfgang Marx (eds), Death, Burial, and the Afterlife. Dublin Death Studies, Carysfort Press, 2014.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Architecture since 1400, University of Minnesota Press,  2014
  • Emily Mark FitzGerald, Commemorating the Irish Famine: Memory and the Monument, Liverpool University Press, 2013. 
  • Lynda Mulvin (ed.), A Culture of translation: British and Irish Scholarship in the Gennadius Library (1740-1840), The New Griffon 13, The Gennadius Library, American School of Classical Studies, Athens, 2012.
  • Christine Casey & Conor Lucey (eds), Decorative plasterwork in Ireland and Europe: ornament & the early modern interior, Four Courts Press, 2012.
  • Lynda Mulvin (ed.), The Fusion of Neo-Classical Principles, Dublin: Wordwell, 2012.
  • Kathleen James Chakraborty, Anne Fuchs & Linda Shortt (eds), Debating German Cultural Identity since 1989, Camden House Press, 2011.
  • Kathleen James Chakraborty & Sabine Stümper-Krobb (eds), Crossing Borders: Space Beyond Discipline, Oxford: Peter Lang, 2011.
  • Paula Murphy, Nineteenth-Century Irish Sculpture, Native Genius Reaffirmed, London: Yale University Press, 2010.
  • Karen E. Brown (ed.), Women's Contributions to Visual Culture, 1918-1939, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2008.
  • Michael McCarthy & Karina O'Neill (eds), Studies in the Gothic Revival, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Darmstadt in Context — Architecture and Design Reform c 1900', in “Eine Stadt müssen wir erbauen, eine ganze Stadt!,” Die Künsterkolonie Darmstadt auf der Mathildenhöhe, Wiesbaden: Landesamt für Denkmalpflege, 2017.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Is Modern Architecture Good?', in Peter Voggler & Stefan Graf (eds), Architecture in Asmara: Colonial Origin and Postcolonial Experience, Berlin: Dom, 2107.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Sir Hugh Lane (1875-1915), Harold Ainsworth Peto (1854-1933), James Miller (1860-1947) and the designs of the Cunard Liners RMS Lusitania and RMS Mauretania', in B. Dawson & J. O'Donnell (eds) Sir Hugh Lane 'That Great Pictured Song', Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, 2017.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Identity and Shifting Attitudes in Medieval Europe', in Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle (Sept, 2017)
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Ireland and Europe: Transmission of Celtic Aesthetic in the Early Middle Ages', in Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle (Sept, 2017).
  • Lynda Mulvin, W. Hupperetz & M. Schmauder, 'Crossroads Travelling through the Middle Ages, AD 300-1000', in Crossroads. Travelling through the Middle Ages, WBOOKS, Zwolle (Sept, 2017).
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Visual Culture and the Irish Revolution', 'The Easter Lily’, 'The Death of Cúchulainn in the GPO', in ed. John Crowley, Donal O’Drisceoil, Mike Murphy and John Borgonovo, Atlas of the Irish Revolution, Cork University Press (Sept, 2017).
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Exiles and Immigration', Very Vary Veri, 5: 2017.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Schocken Department Store: ‘The Art of a Master'', in Twentieth-Century Architecture (Vol 4, The Companions to the History of Architecture), Wiley/Blackwell, 2017.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, 'Known unknowns: research on Irish museums seince 2008', Cultural TrendsVol. 26, Issue 3, 2017.
  • Carla Briggs, 'Out of the Shadows', Irish Arts Review, 34: 2, summer 2017.
  • Conor Lucey, 'Making Magnificence: architects, stuccatori and the eighteenth-century interior’, book review, Irish Arts Review, 34: 2, summer 2017.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Art, Nature and Modernity in the work of Jack B. Yeats and Paul Henry', in Jack B. Yeats and Paul Henry: Contrasting Visions of Ireland, Hunt Museum, Limerick, June 2017.
  • Carla Briggs, 'Margaret Clarke (1884-1961) An Independent Spirit', in Margaret Clarke An Independent Spirit, National Gallery of Ireland, May 2017.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, Co-Editor: Irish Journal of Arts Management & Cultural Policy, Volume 4 (April 2017).
  • John Loughman, 'Clara Peeters. Antwerp and Madrid', exhibition review, The Burlington Magazine, CLIX, No. 1368, March 2017.
  • John Loughman, Dutch Art and Urban Cultures 1200-1700 by E. de Bièvre, book review, The Burlington Magazine, CLIX, No. 1367, February 2017.
  • Conor Lucey, ‘William Salmon’, British bronze sculpture founders and plaster figure makers, 1800-1980, National Portrait Gallery, London, (Jan, 2017: read here).
  • Paula Murphy, Entre Deux Rondes: sculpture, ballet, museum, in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Collectors and Collecting: the classical tradition in Ireland', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, 'Irish migration and the museum: histories of public history-making', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • John Loughman, 'Jacob Jordaens’ Dublin Veneration Reassessed', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Native traditions and modern imperatives: Mexico and Ireland in the imagination of Ernie O’Malley', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Louis Kahn’s Yale Center for British Art: an Irish perspective', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Nicola Figgis, ''Sailing to Byzantium': Irish antiquarians and Sicily', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Pat Cooke, 'The Beit paintings controversy and the boundary between public policy and private interests', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Philip Cottrell, ‘The Kid Stays in the Picture’: John, Judas, and the Malchus episode in Caravaggio’s Taking of Christ', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Carla Briggs, 'Metamorphoses: a history of art history at UCD', in Art History after Françoise Henry: 50 years at UCD 1965-2015, Gandon Editions, 2016.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Flamboyant, Gothic, Romanesque: Art and Revolution in the mind of Ernie O’Malley’, in Modern Ireland and Revolution: Ernie O’Malley in Context, Irish Academic Press, 2016.
  • John Loughman, 'Adriaen van de Velde (Amsterdam and London)', exhibition review, The Burlington Magazine,  CLVIII, No. 1364, November 2016.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Out of Step. Michael Kane, modernism and Irish art history', in Hugh Lane Dublin City Gallery exhibition catalogue, Michael Kane: Modality of the Visible, 2016.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Art and Uncertainty: Painting in Ireland 1912-1923' in Brendan Rooney (ed.) Creating History. Stories of Ireland in Art, Irish Academic Press, 2016.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, ‘The Persistence of Vision: Picturing Eviction in the Nineteenth Century’ in Brendan Rooney (ed.) Creating History. Stories of Ireland in Art, Irish Academic Press, 2016.
  • Róisín Kennedy, four entries in Fintan O'Toole (ed.) Modern Ireland in 100 artworks, Royal Irish Academy, 2016.
  • Nicola Figgis, 'The Contribution of Foreign Artists to Cultural Life in eighteenth-century Dublin', in Jane Fenlon, Ruth Kenny, Caroline Pegum and Brendan Rooney (eds) Irish Fine Art in the Early Modern Period: New Perspectives on Artistic Practice 1620-1820, Irish Academic Press, 2016
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'Storm in a Teacup: Irish Modernist Art', in Paige Reynolds (ed.) Modernist Afterlives in Irish Literature and Culture, Anthem Press, 2016.
  • Conor Lucey, 'Owen Biddle and Philadelphia’s real estate market, 1798-1806’, Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, 75:1, 2016.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, ‘Architecture in Transit: Three High-Tech Historicist Airports’ in Anne Fuchs & J.J. Long (eds), Time in German Literature and Culture, 1900-2015, Pallgrave Macmillan, 2016.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Reconstructing faith', Architectural Review, May 2016.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Gesamtkunstwerk and Gender: From Domesticity to Branding and Back Again' in Cartsen Ruhl, Chris Dähne & Rixt Hoekstra (eds), The Death and Life of the Total Work of Art: Henry Van de Velde and the Legacy of a Modern Concept, Jovis, 2015.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Beyond the masters: modernism in South Asian architecture' in Stephen Ross & Allana Lindgren (eds), The Modernist World, Routledge, 2015.
  • Pat Cooke, 'History, materiality and the myth of 1916' in Lisa Godson & Joanna Brück (eds), Making 1916: material and visual culture of the Easter Rising, Liverpool University Press, 2015.
  • Róisín Kennedy, 'The Capuchin Annual: visual arts and the legacy of 1916, one generation on' in Lisa Godson & Joanna Brück (eds), Making 1916: material and visual culture of the Easter Rising, Liverpool University Press, 2015.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Editorial, ABE Journal: Architecture Beyond Europe, 7, 2015.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'The use of ruins in postwar German church reconstruction' in JoAnne Mancini & Keith Bresnahan (eds), Architecture and Armed Conflict: The Politics of Destruction, Routledge, 2014.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Louis Kahn in Ahmedabad and Dhaka', ABE Journal: European Architecture beyond Europe, July 2014.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Reinforced concrete in Louis Kahn’s National Assembly in Dhaka'Frontiers of Architectural Research, March 2014.
  • Philip Cottrell, 'John Donne, Undone, Redone: The John Donne Monument in St Paul’s Cathedral London Reconsidered’ in Philip Cottrell & Wolfgang Marx (eds.), Death, Burial, and the Afterlife - Dublin Death Studies, Carysfort Press, 2014.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, 'Photography and the Visual Legacy of Famine', in Memory Ireland Volume 3: Memory Cruxes: The Famine and The Troubles, Syracuse University Press, 2014.
  • Philip Cottrell, 'Parrasio Micheli's St Francis: a lost work from the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi, Venice' The Burlington Magazine, CLVI, No. 1332, March 2014.
  • Philip Cottrell, 'Painting Poetry: Bonifacio de' Pitati's Triumphs of Petrarch', Artibus et Historiae, Vol. XXXIV, No. 68, 2014.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Chinese Art History as Contemporary Art History: An Outsider’s Perspective' in Shane McCausland and Yin Hwang, On Telling Images of China: Essays in Narrative Painting and Visual Culture, Hong Kong University Press, 2013.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Beyond postcolonialism: New Directions in the history of nonwestern architecture', Frontiers of Architectural Research, November 2013.
  • Paula Murphy, 'Jason Ellis, Corpus', Irish Arts Review, Autumn 2013.
  • Pat Cooke, 'The Artist and the State in Ireland: artist autonomy and the arm's length principle in a time of crisis', Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, 37 (1&2), August 2013.
  • Pat Cooke, 'Stabilising cultural policy: A review of the departmental and non-departmental structures for cultural administration in Ireland', Administration, 61 (1), May 2013.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty & Rachel Lee, 'Marg Magazine: A Tryst with Architectural Modernity: Modern Architecture as seen from an independent India', ABE Journal: European Architecture beyond Europe, February 2013.
  • Pat Cooke, 'The National Museum of Ireland: an ideological history', The Australasian Journal of Irish Studies, 12, December 2012.
  • Philip Cottrell, 'Art Treasures of the United Kingdom and the United States: the George Scharf Papers', Art Bulletin, XCIV, December 2012.
  • John Loughman, 'Domestic Bliss? Images of the family and the home in seventeenth-century Dutch art', in T. Nakamura (ed.), Art and the Intimate Sphere, Kyoto: Kyoto University Press, 2012.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, 'The Irish Famine and Commemorative Culture', in Lindsay Janssen, Vincent Comerford and Christian Noack (eds), The Irish and the Ukrainian Famine: New Sources and New Approaches. London: Anthem Press, 2012.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'From Chicago to Berlin and Back Again', in Mary Jane Jacob and Jacquelyn Bass (eds), Chicago Makes Modern: How Creative Minds Changed Society, University of Chicago Press, 2012.
  • Emily Mark-FitzGerald, "The 'Irish Holocaust': Historical Trauma and the Commemoration of the Famine", in The Visual Politics of Psychoanalysis in a Post-traumatic World, ed. G. Pollock, IB Tauris, 2012.
  • Conor Lucey, ‘Keeping up appearances: redecorating the domestic interior in late eighteenth-century Dublin’, in Elizabeth Fitzpatrick & James Kelly (eds), Domestic Life in Ireland, Royal Irish Academy, 2012.
  • Conor Lucey, 'Building dialectics: urban scenography in late Georgian Dublin', in Gillian O’Brien and Finola O‘Kane (eds), Portraits of the City: Dublin and the Wider World, Four Courts Press, 2012.
  • Kathleen James Chakraborty,  'Beyond Cold War Interpretations: Shaping a New Bauhaus Heritage', New German Critique 116 (Summer 2012).
  • Kathleen James Chakraborty, 'Between Revolution and Reform: The Bauhaus in Context, 1919-23', in Barbican Art Gallery, Bauhaus: Art as Life, König Books, 2012.
  • Róisín Kennedy, Review of The Story of Irish Museums 1790-2000 by M. Bourke [Cork University Press, 2011], Burlington Magazine, CLIV, March 2012
  • Pat Cooke, 'Imperious post-colonialism: dealing with the National Museum of Ireland's non-European collections in a Free State’, in S. Ó Síocháin, P.Garvey and A Drazin (eds), Exhibit Ireland: ethnographic collections in Irish Museums, Wordwell, 2012.
  • Lynda Mulvin, 'Charles Robert Cockerell, Francis Johnston and the dissemination of Neo-Classical principles', in L. Mulvin (ed.) The Fusion of Neo-Classical Principles, Dublin: Wordwell, 2012.
  • Kathleen James-Chakraborty, 'Neo-Classical commodities: from Coade Stone to the fall of the Wall and beyond', in L. Mulvin (ed.) The Fusion of Neo-Classical Principles, Dublin: Wordwell, 2012.
  • Conor Lucey, ‘Pattern books and pedagogies: neo-classicism and the Dublin artisan’ in L. Mulvin (ed.) The Fusion of Neo-Classical Principles, Dublin: Wordwell, 2012.