Postdoctoral Researchers

 

 

Dr Sophie Corser

Project Title: 'The Reader's Joyce: Ulysses, Authorship, and the Authority of the Reader'Leverhulme Trust Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Funding Body: The Leverhulme Trust

Mentor: Professor Anne Fogarty                                    

Project synopsis: 

My current research rethinks the relationships between author, reader, and text in literature and criticism, through a study of James Joyce. This research informs a monograph project titled The Reader’s Joyce, which is under contract with Edinburgh University Press.


The Reader’s Joyce describes and queries the activity of reading prompted by the intertextuality and narrative of Joyce’s Ulysses, focusing on in-depth readings of the novel and its interactions with other texts from classical and contemporary literature to criticism, theory, and biography. Central to this approach are new analyses of the now commonly underplayed significance of Homer’s Odyssey to Ulysses, and of how authority functions in the developing critical reception of Ulysses since its publication. Through the prisms of Ulysses and ‘the Joyce industry’ this monograph will provide new perspectives on the author-reader-text triad in the wider field of literary criticism: diving into layered histories of concepts, challenges, and retreats in order to ask how we read now.

In addition to this work, I am also developing a new research project tentatively titled ‘Women Reading in Contemporary Anglophone Writing’. I hope for this new project to result in a wide-ranging comparative monograph on the practice of reading. It will consider representations of women reading in a variety of written fora, in terms of formal experimentation.

email: sophie.corser@ucdconnect.ie

 

 

Dr Jonathan Creasy

 

Project Title: Poetry in Public Space: Performing Histories and Identities in The Poets' Theatre

Supervisor: Associate Professor Nerys Williams

Funded by The Irish Research Council 

 

Biography: Jonathan C. Creasy (PhD) is a writer, filmmaker, musician, researcher, educator and publisher. He holds a PhD in English Literature from Trinity College Dublin, where he wrote a doctoral thesis on "poetics and pedagogy at Black Mountain College". He is author of The Black Mountain Letters: Poems and Essays (Dalkey Archive Press) and editor of the bestselling anthology, Black Mountain Poems (New Directions). He has given invited lectures and workshops in Harvard University, University of the Arts Berlin, the University of Connecticut and elsewhere. His IRC-funded research is focused on Irish writer, actor and filmmaker Mary Manning Howe and The Poets' Theatre in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the 1950s. In addition to this research, Creasy is a widely published poet and touring musician with interests in arts practice-as-research. He is founder and publisher at New Dublin Press and co-director of Dreamsong Films, an independent Irish production company.

 

Dr John J. Gallagher

 

Project title: Science, Creation, and Cosmology in the Early Medieval Latin West.

Funding body: Irish Research Council.

Mentor: Associate Professor Rebecca Stephenson.

 

John is a Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of English, Drama, and Film. John’s postdoctoral monograph project considers Creation, cosmology, and scientific learning in the computistical, exegetical, and literary traditions of early medieval England, Ireland, and Francia (c. 600–c. 1100). In the early medieval Latin West, the Book of Genesis constituted the principal framework for understanding the origins and development of the natural world. John’s monograph study explores the early medieval worldview by outlining the interface between scientific knowledge and the interpretative and literary traditions of the Bible.

 

John obtained a PhD in English from the University of St Andrews in 2019 where he taught in the School of English, the School of Divinity, and the School of Modern Languages in the Department of Comparative Literature. His thesis focused on biblical exegesis and textual criticism of the early medieval Bible. He is currently revising a monograph based on this thesis entitled ‘Versions of the Bible in Early Medieval England’. John has published articles on scientific knowledge in biblical commentary, encyclopaedic texts, the six ages of the world, eschatology, and the thought of Augustine of Hippo. John is also currently working on a reader’s edition of the Old English Bible which brings together all major scriptural translations from early medieval England for the first time in a single collection. John has attendant research interests in Patristics, the fourth-century Gothic Bible, and the influence of the Bible on English literature. John is an External Member of the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies at the University of Sheffield.

 

Email: john.gallagher@ucd.ie

 

 

 

Dr Sarah Galletly 

 

Project Title: Serial Aboriginal Encounters in Colonial Periodical Fiction, 1840s-1890sERC Postdoctoral Research Fellow for the SouthHem project

Funding Body: European Research Council

Mentor: Professor Porscha Fermanis

Project Synopsis:

My current research focuses on the settler imaginary of the Indigene in the popular print culture of nineteenth-century Australia. In her recent study, A World of Fiction (2018), Katherine Bode draws attention to a surprisingly large collection of serials featuring Aboriginal characters in nineteenth-century Australian periodicals, arguing that in nineteenth-century periodical fiction “the unsettled colonial condition is evoked by depicting, not repressing, the Aboriginal presence” (2018, 177). These findings identify a large body of periodical fiction featuring indigenous characters that remains underexamined by scholars for the ways settler writers and readers imagined notions of otherness, co-habitation, and belonging.

Utilising Bode and Hetherington’s “To Be Continued” database of periodical fiction as a starting point, this project considers the ‘limits’ or gaps in the project of Australian settlement that serial texts highlight through an exploration of how settler authors formulated ideologically acceptable and more ‘suspect’ manifestations of Aboriginal presence, mobilities, and persistence. It considers how the structure of the serial itself worked to reinforce perceptions of Aboriginal-settler frontier violence and white supremacy. This study also draws attention to moments of settler discomfort and unsettlement within these texts that operate as counterpoints to the larger imperatives of this periodical fiction to support and reinforce the colonial project.

More information on the SouthHem project can be found at: www.ucd.ie/southhem

email: sarah.galletly@ucd.ie

 

Dr Suz Garrard  ‌‌ ‌                                               

Media Migrants: Emigration, Identity-Making, and the Irish Press, 1814-1910

Funding Body: Irish Research Council

Mentor: Associate Professor Fionnuala Dillane

Project synopsis: 

As twenty-first century news reporting surrounding the recent surges in immigration to North America and Europe has shown, representations of immigrants and immigration vary from humanitarian in politically Left-leaning media outlets, to xenophobic portrayals in publications aligned with the social and political Right. These disparate typologies of immigration have their social, political, and literary roots in the nineteenth-century periodical press and, I argue, particular insight is to be gained from examining the complexities of constructions of Irish emigration in the periodical press from 1814 1910. This project explores how a cross-section of newspapers published in Dublin and Belfast constructed emigrant identity during three of the largest upsurges of Irish emigration: movements that were forced by decreased access to rural land and employment between 1814 and 1841, those caused by the Great Famine between 1845 and 1855, and those attributable to the continued post famine decline between 1865 and 1910. Among print cultures, the newspaper is unique in its ability to deploy various affective genres and is hugely influential in identity formation because of its repetitive regularity of its publication cycles and diverse core features. In an era that saw the exponential growth of urban literacy rates and the growing divide between Unionist and Republican causes, the discourse surrounding emigrant identity in Belfast and Dublin newspapers was an omnipresent feature of nineteenth-century newspapers, and a subject that integrated discourses of nationalism, religious and class identity, and literary genre.

email: suz.garrard@ucd.ie

 

Dr Megan Kuster

Project Title: ‘William Colenso, Indigenous Labour and the Nineteenth-Century Global Natural History Trade in the Southern Hemisphere’

ERC Postdoctoral Research Fellow on the ‘SouthHem’ project

Funding Body: European Research Council

Mentor: Professor Porscha Fermanis                                    

Project synopsis: 

My project aims to recuperate some of the histories of Indigenous labour and knowledge production in colonial New Zealand’s histories of science, in a case study of the archive of William Colenso, a nineteenth-century resident New Zealand botanist and missionary. My research is part of the ‘SouthHem’ project which considers the emergence of literary modernity across the colonial southern hemisphere and includes a focus on mediating institutions and encounters between Indigenous and white settler populations.

Recent work on the global nature of the natural history trade has traced the logistical infrastructure of the trade and the role of scientific networks in supplying provincial and metropolitan institutions with specimens. Despite these advances, there is a serious gap in current scholarship in relation to the contributions of Indigenous people and societies to networks of imperial science. Tracing the transnational movement of botanical specimens in the nineteenth-century global natural history trade, my project identifies that differentiated labour surfaces in relation to tropes of natural history ‘discovery’ and investigates the implications of this on where in the colonial archive Indigenous contributions to natural history collecting may be found. I present critical readings of the colonial archive in which ‘official’ sources (such as journal articles and botanical publications) are supplemented with less official sources (such as field journals and familiar letters), contending that it is often these less official sources that contain traces of complex networks of agency, resistance and autonomy.

I am currently developing this work into a book-length project tentatively titled ‘Moving Matter: Indigenous Labour, Commodity Chains and Natural Capital in Colonial New Zealand’, covering seventy years of botanical, zoological, geological, and paleontological science, and popular natural history writing in colonial New Zealand from 1835-1907. In addition to recuperating the histories of Indigenous labour and knowledge production in colonial New Zealand’s histories of science, farming and extractive industries, this project will investigate questions of agency and coercion in the use of Indigenous labour in trans-imperial networks of colonial science as well as contribute to attempts to decolonise science and its institutions.

 email:megan.kuster@ucd.ie

 

Dr Conor Linnie

Project title: The Inter-Arts Networks of British and Irish Postwar Periodical Culture 

Funding Body: Irish Research Council

Mentor: Associate Professor Lucy Collins 

Project synopisis:

My research project explores the periodical networks that connected independent literary and artistic activity in Britain and Ireland during the two decades after the Second World War. It maps the migrant milieu of writers and artists who circulated between the two islands and who found crucial focal points of creativity and association in a cluster of interlinked little magazines including Envoy, The Bell, Irish Writing, Horizon, Nimbus and X: A Quarterly Review of Literature and Art. The project is the first interdisciplinary study of its kind to seriously consider the overlapping worlds of literature and the visual arts in Britain and Ireland during the postwar era. It establishes the little magazine as a key site of inter-arts exchange that stimulated literary and artistic traffic across the Irish Sea.

 As part of my project, I am coordinating a digital humanities collaboration between UCD Special Collections and MoLI Museum, creating a digital exhibition of material from the Patrick Kavanagh Archive. The exhibition explores the world of the literary magazine and its role in shaping the career of one of Ireland's most renowned poets through an open-access online platform that will function as both a public cultural resource and a teaching and learning tool. It offers a multimedia and multilingual experience, presented in both English and Irish, and creating a compelling narrative through a sequence of digitised images, film and audio recordings, illustration and mapping technology. The exhibition is supported by the College of Arts and Humanities Digital Cultures research strand.

email: conor.linnie@ucd.ie

Dr Dolores Resano 

Project Title: Transatlantic Approaches to Contemporary Literature in the Era of Trump

Funding Body: European Commisson, Horizon 2020 

Mentor: Professor Liam Kennedy

Project synopsis:

Dolores Resano is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Clinton Institute for American Studies. She holds a PhD in Construction and Representation of Cultural Identities from the Universitat de Barcelona, with a dissertation titled Of Heroes and Victims: Jess Walter’s The Zero and the Satirical Post-9/11 Novel that dealt with the interrelations between post-9/11 fiction, national identity, and public discourse. Her current research is focused on contemporary American and European literary fiction from a transatlantic perspective, with a special emphasis on the intersections of literature, politics, affect, and public discourse. By applying a transatlantic approach, the project aims to renew and actualize the modes of interpretation in the field of transatlantic literary studies, to produce critically-informed readings of contemporary fiction that is responding to the crisis of transatlanticism (understood as a shared belief in liberal values), and thus to offer insight into systems of representation, the articulation of structures of power and knowledge, and how these can be re-imagined through literary fiction.

 email: dolores.resano@ucd.ie

 

Dr Martin Schauss 

Project Title: The New Ecological Imaginary: Waste, Water, Energy, and the Built Environment in Twenty-First Century Experimental Prose (2000-2020)

Funding Body: Irish Research Council

Mentor: Dr Sharae Deckard

Project synopsis:

The global convergence of the Covid-19 pandemic and Black Lives Matter pushed imagined futures into public discourse at a speed unthinkable last year. This convergence shows how inseparable racial oppression and colonial dispossession are from global ecologies and climate change. My research traces shifts and changes that led up to this moment, focusing on the language and communication of new Anglophone literature to show how alternative futures are being imagined for the planet and its global citizenry. This way, my research seeks to contribute to urgent efforts within universities, cultural institutions, and beyond, to decolonize and rewrite the lexical and semiotic registers of neoliberal climate governance.

The research project argues that new experimental literatures aim to express how language needs to be repurposed and relearned within and outside literary systems, for the ecological crisis to be rendered and imagined futures to become social reality. As a genre, prose relying on experiments with language and mediation receives scant attention in Environmental Humanities. Yet it is precisely here that we find the most radical reorientation of our ecological grammars and political response. To make this claim, the project periodises for the first time a number of Anglophone writers, including Lisa Robertson, Claudia Rankine, Ben Lerner, Caroline Bergvall, and Renee Gladman, among others. Through an eco-materialist method, I analyse four co-produced ‘resources’—waste, water, energy, built environment—in the literary case studies. What connects these cross-generic, diasporic case studies is the urgency with which they place issues like race, class, gender, and colonialism in the centre of ecological thinking.

Stressing the value of literary inquiry in Environmental Humanities, the study contests the influence that Anthropocene thinkers like Latour or Morton have on climate change discourse, offering a vital critique of ecological discourse that prioritises matter and the nonhuman over the social inequity and racial violence that produced the current crisis.

email: martin.schauss@ucd.ie

 

Dr Zosia Kuczyńska

Project Title: ‘Brian Friel: A Playwright of Ideas’

Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Funding Body: Irish Research Council

Mentor: Professor Emilie Pine

Project synopsis:

This multi-strand research project combines archival scholarship and practice-based research to interrogate the Brian Friel Papers at the National Library of Ireland as both a record and a site of live creative encounters. In showcasing the composition process and intellectual eclecticism of a globally significant Irish playwright, my research uncovers not only the ‘who’ or ‘what’ but also the ‘how’ of literary influence in relation to Friel’s work. These original archival findings form the basis of a monograph, Brian Friel’s Models of Influence, under contract with Palgrave Macmillan.

 

My project is particularly concerned with the idea of influence at the level of artistic practice. In asking how Friel’s engagement with his source materials produced not only new work but also new ways of working, my aim is to open up a major dramatic legacy for contemporary practitioners as well as future scholars. To this end, I am also collaborating with dancer-choreographer Jessie Keenan and performance-maker/director of Tonnta Music Robbie Blake to produce artistic responses to Friel’s composition process. This practice-based element of my research is supported by Arts Council Ireland and will culminate in a performance piece, provisionally titled ‘Don’t anticipate the ending’. This will be accompanied by an on-site/online exhibition at the Museum of Literature Ireland in Spring 2021.

email: zosia.kuczynska@ucd.ie

Twitter: @thefrielpapers

Blog: https://thefrielpapers.wordpress.com/blog/

 

Dr Briony Wickes 

Project Title: European Migrants in the British Imagination: Victorian and Neo-Victorian

Culture (VICTEUR)                                                                                            

Funding Body: European Research Council                             

Mentor: Professor Gerardine Meaney and Dr Derek Greene

Project synopsis:

I am a Research Fellow on the European Research Council project, “European Migrants in the British Imagination: Victorian and Neo-Victorian Culture (VICTEUR)”. The project team is led by Professor Gerardine Meaney (English, Drama, and Film) and Dr Derek Greene (Computer Science). Working with the British Library Nineteenth Century Corpus, consisting of nearly 36,000 digitised books, the VICTEUR project combines data analytics and literary criticism to investigate representations of migrants and by migrants in Victorian fiction, focusing on three primary case studies of Irish, Italian, and Eastern European Jewish migrants. The longer-term aim of the study is to develop a new transhistorical and intra-national model for understanding migration as a key driver of cultural development at the interface of gender, ethnicity and demography.

 

Before joining UCD in 2021, I worked as a Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Glasgow, and taught at King’s College London, where I also received my PhD in 2019. I am completing a monograph, Animal Materials: Ecology, Settlement, and the Nineteenth-Century Novel, 1815-1910, which make the case for the representation of the human-animal divide, reflected in selected nineteenth-century texts, as an ideological lynchpin for settler colonialism. Nineteenth-century colonial culture was always on the go, driven by discourses of expansion, invasion, and growth. But it also generated, and depended upon, material and cultural practices that sought to naturalise and legitimise British hegemony in settler new lands. Drawing on post-Foucauldian theories of biopower and perspectives from critical race studies and animal studies, I argue that nineteenth-century writing locates the tactics and strategies of Victorian settlement in the signs and substances of ‘nonhuman capital’. In five chapters, the book explores the histories and narratives of the settler colonial fur trade, feather industry, whaling industry, meat markets, and wool trade in work by Charles Dickens, Mary Shelley, Olive Schreiner, and H.G. Wells, and identifies the novel as a key literary form that frames Victorian settler colonisation in affective terms, narrating the fantasies and feelings of a culture that found itself increasingly dependent on animals.

 

All Contact details:

NameEmail
Dr Sophie Corser sophie.corser@ucdconnect.ie
Dr Jonathan Creasy jonathan.creasy@ucd.ie
Dr John Gallagher john.gallagher@ucd.ie
Dr Sarah Galletly sarah.galletly@ucd.ie
Dr Suz Garrard suz.garrard@ucd.ie
Dr Zosia Kuczynska zosia.kuczynska@ucd.ie
Dr Megan Kuster megan.kuster@ucd.ie
Dr Conor Linnie conor.linnie@ucd.ie
Dr Maria Mulvany maria.mulvany@ucd.ie
Dr Dolores Resano dolores.resano@ucd.ie
Dr Martin Schauss martin.schauss@ucd.ie
Dr Briony Wickes  briony.wickes@ucd.ie