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Work by staff, postdoctoral researchers and PhD candidates based in UCD School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics.

Turmoil: Instability and insecurity in the eighteenth-century Francophone text

Edited by: Dr Síofra Pierse and Dr Emma Dunne

What is turmoil? This bilingual and interdisciplinary book proposes a distinctive new ontology of turmoil through study of its incidence and impact within the eighteenth-century francophone context. With focus on Enlightenment, revolutionary and post-revolutionary texts, these essays identify three key generative indicators of turmoil: phenomenon; paradigm shift; adaptation. More ->

Translation and Introduction by: Professor Mary Gallagher

In 1927, Paul Morand -- a French diplomat and noted European author -- made two extended trips to the Caribbean, Latin America and the American South. Published in 1929, his travel account begins as a diary about his experience of Venezuela, Curaçao, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Haiti, Trinidad, Jamaica and Cuba and ends with a lengthy essay on Mexico. Morand was already a prolific, cosmopolitan writer but he had not yet acquired his controversial post-war reputation. The stylish writing of 'Caribbean Winter' fizzes with an acute intelligence and a rich -- though sometimes elliptical -- allusiveness (which is why this translation includes explanatory notes). It maps not just Morand's vivid impressions but also his main preoccupations, particularly with the shifting place of Europe in the new world order. More ->

Ireland in the European Eye

Edited by: Bettina Migge and Gisela Holfter

A comprehensive survey of Ireland's place in Europe, providing a detailed narrative of a cultural relationship that began with Irish missionaries bringing Christianity and learning to the continent. How have Ireland and her people and culture been perceived and represented in Europe? Twenty-two internationally renowned experts address this question through contributions on film, music, art, architecture, media, literature and European Studies.

With contributions from: David Clark, Fiorenzo Fantaccini, Anna Fattori, Joachim Fischer, Paul Gillespie, Anne Karhio, Linda King, Joanna Kosmalska, Marieke Krajenbrink, Brigid Laffan, Fergal Lenehan, Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith, Edward Moxon-Browne, Lynda Mulvin, Anna Ní Ghallachair, Éamon Ó Ciosáin, Thomas O’Connor, Mervyn O’Driscoll, Finola O’Kane, Harry White.

 

Mystical Islam and Cosmopolitanism in Contemporary German Literature: Openness to Alterity.

Author: Dr Joseph Twist

At a time when the place of Muslims in German society is being disputed, this book explores how four contemporary German writers of Muslim backgrounds - Zafer Senocak, SAID, Feridun Zaimoglu, and Navid Kermani - point beyond identity politics and suggest new ways of thinking about religion and community. Twist highlights both the spirituality and the cosmopolitanism of these authors, bringing their thought into dialogue with the work of Jean-Luc Nancy. More...

Joseph Twist (2018) Mystical Islam and Cosmopolitanism in Contemporary German Literature: Openness to Alterity. Rochester, NY: Camden House

Ego-histories of France and the Second World War

Edited by: Dr Manu Braganca and Fransiska Louwagie

This volume presents the intellectual autobiographies of fourteen leading scholars in the fields of history, literature, film and cultural studies who have dedicated a considerable part of their career to researching the history and memories of France during the Second World War. Based in five different countries, Margaret Atack, Marc Dambre, Laurent Douzou, Hilary Footitt, Robert Gildea, Richard J. Golsan, Bertram M. Gordon, Christopher Lloyd, Colin Nettelbeck, Denis Peschanski, Renée Poznanski, Henry Rousso, Peter Tame, and Susan Rubin Suleiman have played a crucial role in shaping and reshaping what has become a thought-provoking field of research. This volume, which also includes an interview with historian Robert O. Paxton, clarifies the rationales and driving forces behind their work and thus behind our current understanding of one of the darkest and most vividly remembered pages of history in contemporary France.

Manu Braganca and Fransiska Louwagie (eds). Ego-histories of France and the Second World War: Writing Vichy (Palgrave, 2018).

Sixteen Cantigas de Santa Maria: With Dotted Rhythm

Edited by: Martin G. Cunningham (Emeritus Professor of Spanish at UCD)

The Cantigas de Santa Maria, a collection of over 400 songs praising the Virgin Mary and narrating her miracles, constitutes one of the most important collections of vernacular songs ('vernacular' in this case being Galician) to survive with their music from before 1300. The collection was assembled at the direction of Alfonso X 'The Learned', king (1252-84) of Castile and Leon, who may also have composed some of the texts and even melodies. The musical notation in the three surviving musically-notated manuscripts conveys the melodies without diffuculty to a modern reader. However, some aspects of rhythmic inter-pretation (i.e. the relative duration of the notational symbols, of which there are over 150) are still a matter for debate

Germanistik in Ireland, Volume 12, 2017

Edited by: Dr Gillian Pye and Christiane Schönfeld

Germanistik in Ireland: Jahrbuch der / Yearbook of the Association of Third-Level Teachers of German in Ireland (the Yearbook) is the official publication of the Association of Third-Level Teachers of German in Ireland. It appears once a year. Each member of the Association of Third-Level Teachers of German in Ireland receives one copy of the Yearbook as part of their membership. The aim of the Yearbook is to provide a forum for the publication of research in German Studies in the broadest and most inclusive sense, comprising literary and cultural studies, history and Landeskundeof the German-speaking countries, applied and theoretical linguistics, German as a Foreign Language and Fachdidaktikincluding German for special purposes, and other related areas.

Italian Women's Autobiographical Writings in the Twentieth Century: Constructing Subjects

Author: Associate Professor Ursula Fanning

This book highlights the centrality of the autobiographical enterprise to Italian women’s writing through the twentieth century—a century that has frequently been referred to as the century of the self. Ursula Fanning addresses the thorny issue of essentialism potentially involved in underlining links between women’s writing and autobiographical modes, and ultimately rejects it in favor of an argument based on the cultural, linguistic, and literary marginalization of women writers within the Italian context.

Ursula Fanning (2017) Italian Women's Autobiographical Writings in the Twentieth Century: Constructing Subjects. New Jersey: Fairleigh Dickinson university press

Dante and the Seven Deadly Sins

Edited by: John C. Barnes (Emeritus Professor of Italian at UCD) & Daragh O'Connell

This volume opens with the bold suggestion that the seven deadly sins constitute a key to the structure of Inferno and Paradiso as well as Purgatorio. It ends with a discussion of cowardice (not strictly a deadly sin) in Inferno III, followed by a look at Dante himself in the light of all the capital vices. In between, each of the seven is focused on in turn. Intellectual pride is cited as the reason for Cavalcanti’s absence from the Commedia, while – separately – the pride cantos in Purgatorio are read as a reconstruction of the individual’s passage from pride to piety. Read more ->

The book was published for the UCD Foundation for Italian Studies.

Conduct Literature for and About Women in Italy 1470-1900 : Prescribing and Describing Life

Edited by: Dr Francesco Lucioli & Helena Sanson

Conduct literature for and about women represents a very broad but still little-studied body of works that is essential for the understanding of the cultural construction of femininity. Conduct texts, being both prescriptive and descriptive sources, offer a fascinating account of and insight into the changing role of women across the centuries according to the needs of society. On the one hand, they record ideological constructions, models, and aspirations, and on the other they reflect contemporary realities, norms, and customs. The essays in this volume aim to trace some of the main features of conduct literature in the Italian tradition, from the last decades of the fifteenth century to the post-unification period.

Helena Sanson and Francesco Lucioli (Ed.). (2016) Dalle Regole del Fortunio a una grammatica dell'utente, 1516-2016: grammatiche, cultura e società in Italia e in Europa, special issue of The Italianist. London: Taylor & Francis.

Re-Thinking Ressentiment

Edited by: Prof Mary Gallagher and Dr Jeanne Riou

Our era seems beset by the peddling of ‘post truth’ politics, by the derision of critical voices as purveyors of ‘fake news’ and by the convulsive hold of chauvinistic nationalisms and populist agendas. Against that backdrop, ‘Ressentiment’ is a notion that
deserves renewed attention and analysis. This book’s reappraisal focuses on the past/present predicament of critical discourse, pointing up some of the many ways and contexts in which ‘dissensus’ is limited or disabled either by ‘Ressentiment’ or by accusations of ‘Ressentiment’.

Jeanne Riou, Mary Gallagher (ed.) (2016) Ressentiment: on the Limits of Criticism and the Limits of its Critics. Bielefeld, Germany: Transcript (distrib. Columbia UP).

Print Culture in Early Modern France

Edited by: Dr Derval Conroy & Prof. Jean-Paul Pittion (TCD)

This collective volume of nine essays, bringing together researchers from France and Ireland and edited by Derval Conroy and Jean-Paul Pittion, is part of an ongoing project led by the editors which aims to contribute to scholarship concerning the early modern French book. As the editors point out in the Foreword, the volume is informed by the belief that ‘the role the printed works of the period played as cultural instruments which reflect, shape or support the ideas, prejudices or tastes of the milieus which created and received them, cannot be properly evaluated if the material and commercial conditions in which they were produced are not taken into account’.

Derval Conroy and Jean-Paul Pittion (Ed.). (2016) Print Culture in Early Modern France. Dublin: Irish Journal of French Studies.

Ruling Women, Volume 1

Author: Derval Conroy

Ruling Women is the first study of its kind devoted to an analysis of the debate concerning government by women in seventeenth-century France. Drawing on a wide range of political, feminist and dramatic texts, Conroy sets out to demonstrate that the dominant discourse which upholds patriarchy at the time is frequently in conflict with alternative discourses which frame gynæcocracy as a feasible, and laudable reality, and which reconfigure (wittingly or unwittingly) the normative paradigm of male authority. Central to the argument is an analysis of how the discourse which constructs government as a male prerogative quite simply implodes when juxtaposed with the traditional political discourse of virtue ethics. In Government, Virtue, and the Female Prince in Seventeenth-Century France, the first volume of the two-volume study, the author examines the dominant discourse which excludes women from political authority before turning to the configuration of women and rulership in the pro-woman and egalitarian discourses of the period. Highly readable and engaging, Conroy's work will appeal to those interested in the history of women in political thought and the history of feminism, in addition to scholars of seventeenth-century literature and history of ideas.

D. Conroy (2016) Ruling Women. Vol 1. Government, Virtue and the Female Prince in Seventeenth-Century France. London & New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ruling Women, Volume 2

Author: Derval Conroy

Ruling Women is a two-volume study devoted to an analysis of the conflicting discourses concerning government by women in seventeenth-century France. In this second volume, Configuring the Female Prince in Seventeenth-Century French Drama, Conroy analyzes over 30 plays published between 1637 and 1691, examining the range of constructions of queenship that are thrown into relief. The analysis focuses on the ways in which certain texts strive to manage the cultural anxiety produced by female rule and facilitate the diminution of the uneasy cultural reality it represents, while others dramatize the exercise of political virtue by women, explode the myth of gender-differentiated sexual ethics, and suggest alternative constructions of gender relations to those upheld by the normative discourses of sexual difference. The approach is underpinned by an understanding of theatre as fundamentally political, a cultural institution implicated in the maintenance of, and challenge to, societal power relations. Innovative and stimulating, Conroy's work will appeal to scholars of seventeenth-century drama and history of ideas, in addition to those interested in the history of women in political thought and the history of feminism.

D. Conroy (2016) Ruling Women. Vol 2. Configuring the Female Prince in Seventeenth-Century French Drama. London & New York: Palgrave Macmillan

The Dark Side of Diderot / Le Diderot des ombres

Edited by: Associate Professor Siofra Pierse

This collection of essays investigates the darker aspects of Diderot, writer, art critic, philosopher and encyclopédiste. The chapters focus on the schism between positive images of the Enlightenment and an undercurrent of disorder, transgression and clandestine intellectual and social practices. Diderot’s role in this fissure is critically scrutinised through an analysis of the interface between Enlightenment and its dark side. In his reticence before authority and censorship, in the richness and complexity of his literary and philosophical works, in the emotional conflict of his theatre, or in his innovative aesthetic vision, Diderot consistently evokes the darker side of the Enlightenment.

Síofra Pierse and James Hanrahan (eds) (Ed.). (2016) The Dark Side of Diderot / Le Diderot des ombres. Bern: Peter Lang.

Anthropology of Connection

Author: Dr Jeanne Riou

Examining perception in the discourses of 1900, this study aims to uncover some of the less apparent emotional undercurrents of scientific theories of understanding. "Connections" may be either theories of society and social action, (ambivalent ties as described by Simmel and Plessner, repressive ones, as we see in Freud), or they may be a manner of narrating the self and its links, emotional and intellectual, to the world. They can be energetic in the sense of Schopenhauer's will, motivational in the sense of Nietzsche's will-to-power, empathic in the sense of early phenomenology, or object-driven and therefore ethical, in the sense of Husserl. They can be suggestive - adapting the Heraclitean notion of flow, as we can see at different points in writers as diverse as Husserl, William James and Henri Bergson, or declarative, in the sense of Arnold Gehlen, for whom connections are institutional - human beings, with a reduced instinct in comparison to other creatures, forge links to the world by means of the culture they produce. Connections can be many things at once - physiological effects of perception - or psychological responses to perception. In this study, they are seen as implicit, but nonetheless important discursive forces.

Riou, J.; (2014) Anthropology of Connection. Perception and its Emotional Undertones in German Philosophical Discourse, 1870-1930. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.

Il nome

Author: Dr Paolo Acquaviva

Che cos'è un nome? Ha un senso approfondire una nozione apparentemente così intuitiva? Come può contribuire a una maggiore consapevolezza linguistica esaminare i modi in cui il linguaggio identifica le entità a cui pensiamo? Il libro risponde a queste e altre domande, stimolando il lettore a riflettere sul significato dei nomi, sulle loro categorie grammaticali, sulla loro forma e struttura, presentando un quadro ricco e articolato in cui confluiscono i risultati delle ricerche contemporanee in semantica, filosofia del linguaggio, tipologia linguistica, morfologia e sintassi.

What is a noun or a name? Does it even make sense to make precise a notion that looks so intuitive? How can a better understanding of the way language identifies entities contribute to a better linguistic awareness? This book addresses these and similar questions. It proposes a reflection on the meaning of nouns and names, their grammar, and their form and structure. A rich and articulated picture emerges from this description, which joins together the results of current research in semantics, philosophy of language, linguistic typology, morphology, and syntax.

Acquaviva, P. (2013), Il nome, Carocci editore, Rome.

Exploring Language in a Multilingual Context: Variation, Interaction and Ideology in Language Documentation

Author: Prof Bettina Migge and Isabelle Léglise

Proposing a new methodological approach to documenting languages spoken in multilingual societies, this book retraces the investigation of one unique linguistic space, the Creole varieties referred to as Takitaki in multilingual French Guiana. It illustrates how interactional sociolinguistic, anthropological linguistic, discourse analytical and quantitative sociolinguistic approaches can be integrated with structural approaches to language in order to resolve rarely discussed questions systematically (what are the outlines of the community, who is a rightful speaker, what speech should be documented) that frequently crop up in projects of language documentation in multilingual contexts. The authors argue that comprehensively documenting complex linguistic phenomena requires taking into account the views of all local social actors (native and non native speakers, institutions, linguists, non-speakers etc.), applying a range of complementary data collection and analysis methods and putting issues of ideology, variation, language contact and interaction centre stage. This book will be welcomed by researchers in sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, fieldwork studies, language documentation and language variation and change.

Migge, B., Léglise, I.; (2013) Exploring Language in a Multilingual Context: Variation, Interaction and Ideology in Language Documentation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

New Perspectives on Irish English

Edited by: Prof Bettina Migge & Dr Máire Ní Chiosáin

Proposing a new methodological approach to documenting languages spoken in multilingual societies, this book retraces the investigation of one unique linguistic space, the Creole varieties referred to as Takitaki in multilingual French Guiana. It illustrates how interactional sociolinguistic, anthropological linguistic, discourse analytical and quantitative sociolinguistic approaches can be integrated with structural approaches to language in order to resolve rarely discussed questions systematically (what are the outlines of the community, who is a rightful speaker, what speech should be documented) that frequently crop up in projects of language documentation in multilingual contexts. The authors argue that comprehensively documenting complex linguistic phenomena requires taking into account the views of all local social actors (native and non native speakers, institutions, linguists, non-speakers etc.), applying a range of complementary data collection and analysis methods and putting issues of ideology, variation, language contact and interaction centre stage. This book will be welcomed by researchers in sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, fieldwork studies, language documentation and language variation and change.

Migge. B. & M. Ní Chiosáin (Ed.). (2012) New Perspectives on Irish English. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

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